NIAID reports potential West Nile treatment

first_img The researchers decided to develop their treatment, a monoclonal antibody, after they found that antibodies taken from the blood of people who had recovered from West Nile fever could cure mice infected with WNV, the NIAID said. But antibodies derived from human blood vary in their ability to fight disease, and they can be accompanied by other potentially dangerous infectious agents, despite efforts to purify them. See also: To solve these problems, the research team “made 46 monoclonal antibodies against West Nile virus and then eliminated the less effective ones through a tedious molecular-level screening process,” the NIAID said. Then they worked with MacroGenics, Inc., Rockville, Md., to create a human-like version of the most effective antibody. WNV causes no symptoms or only a mild flu-like illness in most people. But in about 1 in 150 people infected, the virus invades the central nervous system and can be fatal. The United States had 2,470 reported cases of West Nile disease in 2004, with 88 deaths, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Apr 25, 2005 (CIDRAP News) – Researchers have developed an antibody that can cure mice of West Nile virus (WNV) infection, a disease for which no specific treatment now exists, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases announced yesterday. Oliphant T, Engle M, Nybakken GE, et al. Development of a humanized monoclonal antibody with therapeutic potential against West Nile virus. Nat Med 2005 Apr 24 (early online publication) [Full text] The research, funded in part by the NIAID, is described in a report published online yesterday by Nature Medicine. “MacroGenics stitched the part of the antibody that cripples the West Nile virus into the scaffold of a human antibody,” the statement said. “The monoclonal antibody was several hundred times more potent in cell culture tests than antibodies obtained from people who had recovered from West Nile virus infection.” A team at Washington University in St. Louis “developed an infection-fighting antibody that mimics one produced by people whose immune systems successfully fend off the West Nile virus,” the NIAID said in a news release. “The researchers tested their antibody in mice and say its success warrants further development and testing in people with West Nile disease.” “We could give this antibody to mice as long as five days after infection, when West Nile virus had entered the brain, and it could still cure them,” senior investigator Michael Diamond, MD, PhD, said in the news release. “It also completely protected the mice against death.” NIAID news releasehttp://www.niaid.nih.gov/news/newsreleases/2005/Pages/westniletherapy.aspxlast_img read more

D.C. Businesses Ordered Closed

first_imgGREENSBURG, Ind. – The Decatur County Board of Commissioners, the executive body of county government, issued an Emergency Ordinance Saturday afternoon.  The measure declares a two-week period, beginning Monday, March 23, at 8:00 a.m., during which all non-essential businesses should close.  Below is the complete text of the ordinance, along with a statements of support from Decatur County Public Health Officer Dr. Arthur Alunday, and Greensburg Mayor Josh Marsh.Ordinance No. 2020-____AN EMERGENCY ORDINANCE OF THEDECATUR COUNTY BOARD OF COMMISSIONERSWHEREAS, Decatur County believes its residents are immediately threatened by the Coronavirus/COVID19 and believe it is imperative to take action at this time in an effort to protect citizens and contain the spread of the virus to the greatest extent possible, andWHEREAS, Covidl9 is a respiratory disease that can result in serious illness and death and is easily transmitted from person to person, and:WHEREAS, on January 31, 2020 the United States Department of Health and Human Services Secretary declared a public emergency for the COVID-19, and:WHEREAS, on March 6, 2020 Governor Eric J. Holcomb issued his Declaration of Public Health Emergency for the State of Indiana for COVID-19, and:WHEREAS, The Board of Commissioners of Decatur County, pursuant to IC 36-8-2-4 and 5, is authorized to regulate conduct that might endanger the public health, safety or welfare and to impose restrictions to prevent the transmission of diseases, and:WHEREAS, due to potential severity of COVID-19 and the need to take urgent action, the following is effective Monday March 23, 2020 at 8:00 amNOW, THEREFORE, the Board of Commissioners of Decatur County, Indiana, do hereby:Declare that a public health emergency exists in Decatur County due to COVID-19.For a period of two (2) weeks, only critical or essential business should remain open. All other non-essential businesses should remain closed.Only those organizations providing essential services such as Community food assistance, Meals on Wheels, counseling services, transportation assistance, and the like may remain open subject to further review.Critical Essential businesses to remain open, include, but are not limited to:All health care service providers, including doctor offices, hospitals, pharmacies, and therapy establishments;Essential City of Greensburg and Decatur County governmental service offices;Grocery Stores;Funeral homes;Banks, lending institutions and all other related businesses;Gas stations and auto repair businesses;Convenience stores;“Dollar” stores;Day care facilities;Restaurants and bars (carry out, delivery, and drive up only;Utility and Trash ServicesAirport;Postal Services/ Delivery Services;Veterinarian clinics;Home improvement/hardware;Hotels/Motels;Laundromats;Public Transportation;Agricultural Operations;Legal Services;Social Service agencies such as the Red Cross, Salvation Army, etc.;It is recommended to limit travel to essential business only, such as grocery, medical, pharmacy, or work.There should be no public gatherings of more than ten (10) people and all residents are to attempt at all possible times to maintain a social distance of six (6) feet or more from others. The 10 person restriction does not apply to work places so long as the social distancing guidelines are followed and internal safeguards are put in place with regard to cleaning and social distancing.The Board of Commissioners acknowledge the hardship and sacrifice that is being imposed on the businesses and citizens of Decatur County by these closures. These restrictions will be revisited as the COVID-19 circumstances change, and are subject to revision as deemed appropriate for the health and well-being of Decatur County Citizens.This is an ongoing and evolving public health crisis. Refusal to comply may result in suspension of permits as well as fines by order of the Decatur County Health Department and the Health Officer under IC 16-20-1-19 and IC16-20-1-21.Read and adopted this 21st day of March, 2020.Supporting Statement From Mayor Joshua Marsh:As the world, United States, Indiana, and Decatur County continue to battle COVID-19, we have seen our community come together to lend a hand to one another. Both County and City Officials have worked well together over the last several weeks, and now the City of Greensburg joins the Decatur County Commissioners in supporting travel restrictions for nonessential business and personal travel. We also join the call for all nonessential businesses to close for at least the next two weeks. We will continue to work closely with each group and every major employer and service provider to keep a unified front against this outbreak. We ask that all residents join us and adhere to these restrictions to help keep Greensburg and Decatur County as safe and healthy as possible.Supporting Statement of Decatur County Public Health Officer Dr. Arthur Alunday:Due to the evolving situation with the COVID-19 pandemic, the Decatur County Health Department is convinced it is absolutely necessary to take more extensive measures to control this of this decision is about not only protecting our citizens but also about limiting the burden on the local healthcare system so that it is not overwhelmed and can continue to serve our entire community. We appreciate everyone’s cooperation and sacrifice to keep Decatur County safe.last_img read more

22.8% of female undergrads at ISU say they’ve been sexually assaulted

first_imgAMES — A new survey finds more than one in five women who are Iowa State University students say they have been the victims of sexual assault during their college career.The Association of American Universities surveyed students at 33 institutions across the country, including about 4,800 at Iowa State University.It’s a follow-up to a 2015 survey and ISU’s resultsshow about a one-and-a-half percent increase in the number of female, male and transgender students who say they have been sexually assaulted.Nearly 23 percent of women undergrads at ISU said they’d been assaulted. In a written statement, Iowa State University president Wendy Wintersteen said the survey results will help refine programs that move closer to the goal of preventing sexual assault and misconduct on the Ames campus.Iowa State officials say they’re seeing an improvement in the number of bystanders who are willing to intervene, as three-quarters of those who said they had witnessed troubling behavior took some sort of action. The national survey found virtually no male victims and only 16.5 percent of female victims of campus sexual assault reported it to campus or city authorities.In addition, the majority of incidents occurred on a campus or on property affiliated with one of the 33 universities, including fraternity houses and residence halls.last_img read more