Vermont gets $1.47 million in federal grants to help crime victims

first_imgPatrick Leahy (D-VT) announced Tuesday that Vermont has been awarded more than $1.47 million in federal grants to help victims of crime.  The grants come from the Crime Victims Fund, the primary source of federal financial aid for crime victims, and are administered through the US Department of Justice.“The need for victim assistance and compensation has grown over the years, and the Crime Victims Fund has been a mainstay for crime victims in states like Vermont,” said Leahy.  “Programs like those supported by the Vermont Center for Crime Victim Services help survivors piece their lives back together.  The vital funding Vermont has received from the Crime Victims Fund will help to ensure continued support for these efforts.”Vermont has received $1.27 million for victim assistance programs to support local efforts such as crisis intervention, emergency shelters, transportation, counseling and criminal justice system advocacy.  The state has also received $200,000 for compensation programs to reimburse victims and their families directly for expenses related to their victimization, including medical and mental health costs, and funeral burial expenses.  The funding is administered by the Vermont Center for Crime Victim Services.Leahy, a former prosecutor in Vermont, has led the effort in Congress to protect the Crime Victims Fund, which the last administration sought to tap for other uses.  The Fund is supported exclusively by fines and other penalties paid by convicted federal offenders, not by taxpayer dollars.  The Fund serves roughly four million crime victims every year, including victims of domestic violence, sexual assault, child abuse, elder abuse and drunk driving, as well as survivors of homicide victims.  Crime Victim Fund grants have become especially important for states at a time when many programs have faced funding cuts in the wake of the economic downturn.Leahy is the author of the Crime Victims Fund Preservation Act, which will help ensure that crime victims receive essential services and federal support under the Victims of Crime Act (VOCA).  Last October, the legislation was approved by the Senate Judiciary Committee, which Leahy chairs.  He also worked to include $100 million for crime victim assistance in the 2009 economic recovery act.More than 4,000 agencies nationwide are supported by VOCA funds each year. Source: Leahy. 9.14.2010last_img read more

Diamond sparkling ahead of return

first_img The eight-year-old son of King’s Best provided his trainer Johnny Murtagh with his biggest success last season when winning the valuable Qipco British Champions Long Distance Cup at Ascot in October. He also claimed a Group Three prize at the Curragh in August, along with a Listed event at Leopardstown in July. Murtagh said: “He is in great form, he is fit and well and we are looking forwarding to seeing him run on Sunday.” Press Association Royal Diamond is reported in “great form” ahead of his seasonal debut in the Coolmore Vintage Crop Stakes at Navan on Sunday.center_img Dermot Weld has made a blistering start to the 2014 Flat season and is represented by Pale Mimosa. This five-year-old daughter of Singspiel won Listed contests at York and Leopardstown last year, while she finished a close-up fourth to Royal Diamond at Ascot. Weld said of his Dr. Ronan Lambe-owned mare: “She has wintered well, and she is coming along nicely. She is having her first run of the season at Navan and I expect her to come on for it.” Saddler’s Rock finished ahead of Royal Diamond in the St Leger at the Curragh in September, but he was then beaten into fifth by Murtagh’s charge at Ascot in October. The six-year-old failed to make an impact in two starts at Meydan over the winter and trainer John Oxx is hoping the rain stays away from Navan before his latest assignment. He said: “He needs good ground, so rain won’t suit and I think it is forecast for Saturday night. We are hoping he will run a good race and it should be a good prep race for the Ascot Gold Cup.” Sir Ector enjoyed a fruitful campaign last year, winning both the Ulster Derby and the Movember Handicap, while he was just three and three-parts of a length off Royal Diamond in a Listed race at Leopardstown last July. He ran a fine race on his last start to finish a close-up fourth in the Martin Molony Stakes at Limerick, on what was his second outing of 2014. He is stepped back up to a mile and six here, and trainer James Lambe said: “He is in good form, the trip should suit, the ground should suit and hopefully he will run a nice race.” Leading Light, who won the St Leger at Doncaster in September, never landed a blow in the Prix de l’Arc de Triomphe at Longchamp but can be expected to make his presence felt now on his first start of the season. The Willie McCreery-trained nine-time winner Leah Claire and the twice-raced Cosmic Cannonball for Jim Bolger complete the field. last_img read more

4 Steps to Ensuring Failure Is Not an Option

first_imgFailing doesn’t have to be an option. In fact, with this four-step process you can even make it an impossibility.Sales expert Geoffrey James knows the secret to never failing again. In a post for Inc. he reveals that it’s a simple, yet incredibly effective four-step process built around a slightly different way of setting and achieving goals. Step one: Set a goal that is both achievable — “within the realm of possibility and tied to actions that you can actually take” — and “inspirational enough to motivate you to take action,” James writes.After consciously determining that you must achieve the goal and that you are committed to it 100%, the next step is to “treat setbacks as signals” to change your approach, rather than “mini-failures” that suggest you should quit. Finally, the fourth step contains the true key to banishing failure — by redefining it. “The simple truth is that you don’t have control over anything except your own behavior,” writes James. “Redefining failure as “failing to take action” puts failure (and therefore success) within your personal control. When the only failure is inactivity, you automatically take the actions required to achieve the goal.” Read James’s full article for more on how you can truly assure failure is not an option.Related Content from OpenView:While James argues that you can eradicate failure, others actually suggest that in order to be truly successful, you need to seek it out. This video provides insight into how you can use failure as a tool for entrepreneurial advancement, and this post from the OpenView Blog explains why you should be trying to fail, not trying to be perfect.AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to PrintPrintShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThislast_img read more