Joselu and Lucas are the best couple of Spanish gunners

first_imgLast summer Deportivo Alavés announced the arrival of two strikers with a great reputation in European football. They were Lucas Pérez (A Coruña, 09/10/1988) and Joselu Mato (Stuttgart, 03/27/1990), who arrived from West Ham United and Newcastle respectively. Two gunners who came from trying their luck in a Premier League who, unfortunately, had not repeated the taste of their goals so regularly as other leagues of the old continent had done. The ‘7’ Coruña scored an unprecedented personal record in the League: 7 consecutive days scoring, something that only he has achieved with the shirt of two different teams in Coruña and Vitoria. A vertiginous figures from which a Joselu has not taken off, who with the goal of last Sunday at Sánchez-Pizjuán shares the figure of top national scorer of LaLiga Santander together with Roger (Levante UD) and Ángel (Getafe CF).The 9 and 8 goals of Joselu and Lucas place them as the Spanish couple that makes the most goals in the league championship. Of the 23 goals that the Vitorian team has achieved, 17 have carried the seal of one of the two. Some figures that approach, but do not exceed, the 16 goals scored by Gerard Moreno and Santi Cazorla, of Villarreal CF. This Friday, before SD Eibar, Deportivo Alavés faces a very important clash facing the goal of permanence. Joselu already knows what it is to score a goal to the armorer team, and that is that ‘9’ was the author of the two goals that marked the first home victory of the course in the Basque feud. Lucas could not travel to Seville last weekend because of discomfort in the pubis but today he has trained with the group normally. His seemed to be a fierce battle to take the position of striker of a babazorra squad who wanted to forget the Calleri and Borja Bastón last year, and the first to hit was a Joselu Mato who scored his first two championship goals in the matches against Levante UD and Getafe CF. A drought scorer of Asier Garitano during the 4,5 and 6 days made fear that the goal albiazul lost his reference, but soon Lucas Pérez joined the cause.last_img read more

Public v Private Interest Rates Sovereign Debt Crisis

first_img Categories: Interest Rates Tags: Government Debt, Interest Rates, Sovereign Debt Crisis Interest Rate & Currency Pegs » QUESTION: Dear Martin I have a question for the blog. There has been forecasts for a sovereign debt crisis but recently you have discussed how various governments may manipulate govt bond interest rates down as has happened in Europe and Japan. If Europe and Japan are anything to go by then this could go on for some time. If govts are successful in this, does this mean that there may not be a sovereign debt crisis?ANSWER: The Sovereign Debt Crisis involves crossing the line where the private sector no longer trusts government debt. We have begun to cross that line in Europe and Japan where the central banks are buying the debt in bulk. There have even been German auctions of bonds where there was no bid.Yes, the central banks can artificially keep government interest rates low, but that is only possible when they are the buyers.We are already experiencing rising interest rates in the peripheral governments where their central banks do not engage in QE — namely emerging markets. We will witness private rates rise for that is a free market. However, from the government side of the table, the Sovereign Debt Crisis is among the developed countries engaging in QE that has unfolded as there is NO BID. They can artificially keep rates low ONLY because the central banks buy the debt. Nobody in the private sector would buy 10 years paper at 1% to 3% when they need 8% to break even in pension funds.Also, pay attention to the state/provincial debt where they do not have the ability to buy their own nonsense. The manipulation of rates will be at the federal level, not in the state/provincial and municipal levels of government.So, pay attention to the bifurcation in rates that is unfolding between PUBLIC v PRIVATE.center_img « Trump v Federal Reserve – Why? last_img read more