Boxer LaMotta, immortalized in ‘Raging Bull,’ dies at 95

first_imgLaMotta threw a fight against Billy Fox, which he admitted in testimony before the Kefauver Committee, a US Senate committee investigating organized crime in 1960.“I purposely lost a fight to Billy Fox because they promised me that I would get a shot to fight for the title if I did,” LaMotta said in 1970 interview printed in Peter Heller’s 1973 book “In This Corner: 40 World Champions Tell Their Stories.”LaMotta was “stopped” by Fox in the fourth round on Nov. 14, 1947, in Madison Square Garden. He didn’t get a title shot until 10 fights later.On June 16, 1949, in Detroit, he became middleweight champion when the Frenchman Marcel Cerdan couldn’t continue after the 10th round.Of the claim that Cerdan had to quit because of a shoulder injury, LaMotta said in 1970: “Something’s bound to happen to you in a tough fight, cut eye, broken nose or broken hand or something like that. So you could make excuses out of anything, you know, but you got to keep on going if you’re a champ or you’re a contender.”ADVERTISEMENT DAY6 is for everybody LATEST STORIES Beermen escape Fuel Masters for share of third place Mos Burger to open in Manila; teases with a pop-up It’s too early to present Duterte’s ‘legacy’ – Lacson Margot Robbie talks about filming ‘Bombshell’s’ disturbing sexual harassment scene Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award In ‘Jojo Rabbit,’ Comedy and Drama Collide Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. “Rest in Peace, Champ,” De Niro said in a statement.The Bronx Bull, as he was known in his fighting days, compiled an 83-19-4 record with 30 knockouts, in a career that began in 1941 and ended in 1954.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSRedemption is sweet for Ginebra, Scottie ThompsonSPORTSMayweather beats Pacquiao, Canelo for ‘Fighter of the Decade’SPORTSFederer blasts lack of communication on Australian Open smogLaMotta fought the great Sugar Ray Robinson six times, handing Robinson the first defeat of his career and losing the middleweight title to him in a storied match.In the fight before he lost the title, LaMotta saved the championship in movie-script fashion against Laurent Dauthuille. Trailing badly on all three scorecards, LaMotta knocked out the challenger with 13 seconds left in the fight.center_img Steam emission over Taal’s main crater ‘steady’ for past 24 hours Renowned for his strong chin, and the punishment he could take, and dish out, LaMotta was knocked down only once – in a 1952 loss to light-heavyweight Danny Nardico – in his 106 fights.LaMotta’s first defense was supposed to be a rematch with Cerdan, but the Frenchman was killed when a plane en route to the United States crashed in the Azores in 1949.So in his first defense, LaMotta outpointed Tiberio Mitri on July 12, 1950, in New York, then on Sept. 13, he rallied to knock out Dauthuille at Detroit.LaMotta’s title reign ended on Feb. 14, 1951, when Robinson stopped him in the 13th round in Chicago. In a fight that became known as the St. Valentine’s Day Massacre, LaMotta gave as good as he got in the early rounds, then took tremendous punishment. He would not go down.In their second match, on Feb. 5, 1943, in New York, LaMotta won a 10-round decision, giving Robinson his first defeat in the 41st fight of his illustrious career.LaMotta was born July 10, 1922, on New York City’s Lower East Side but was raised in the Bronx.After retiring from boxing in 1954, he owned a nightclub for a time in Miami, then dabbled in show business and commercials. He also made personal appearances and for a while in the 1970s he was a host at a topless nightclub in New York.The 1980 film “Raging Bull,” based on LaMotta’s memoir written 10 years earlier, was nominated for eight Academy Awards. Though director Martin Scorsese was passed over, De Niro, who gained 50 pounds to portray the older, heavier LaMotta, won the best actor award.In 1998, LaMotta, who had four daughters, lost both of his sons. Jake LaMotta Jr., 51, died from cancer in February. Joe LaMotta, 49, was killed in plane crash off Nova Scotia in September.A funeral in Miami and a memorial service in New York City are being planned, Baker said. MOST READ In this photo, taken Jan. 27, 2005, Robert DeNiro (left) and boxer Jake LaMotta stand for photographers before watching a 25th anniversary screening of the movie “Raging Bull” in New York. LaMotta, whose life was depicted in the film “Raging Bull,” died Tuesday, Sept. 19, 2017, at a Miami-area hospital from complications of pneumonia. He was 95. (Photo by JULIE JACOBSON / AP)MIAMI — Jake LaMotta, the former middleweight champion whose life in and out of the ring was depicted in the film “Raging Bull,” for which Robert De Niro won an Academy Award, has died, his fiancee said Wednesday. He was 95.LaMotta died Tuesday at a Miami-area hospital from complications of pneumonia, according to fiancee Denise Baker.ADVERTISEMENT Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next View comments Jake says relationship with Shaina ‘goes beyond physical attraction’ OSG plea to revoke ABS-CBN franchise ‘a duplicitous move’ – Lacson How to help the Taal evacueeslast_img read more

Researchers detect CWD prions in Wisconsin soils for the first time

first_img Source:https://news.wisc.edu/cwd-prions-discovered-in-soil-near-wisconsin-mineral-licks-for-the-first-time/ May 4 2018New research out of the University of Wisconsin-Madison has, for the first time, detected prions responsible for chronic wasting disease (CWD) in samples taken from sites where deer congregate.Scientists searched for prions at mineral licks — areas where deer seek out essential nutrients and minerals — in the CWD endemic area across south-central Wisconsin. Out of 11 sites, nine had detectable levels of the disease-causing misfolded proteins. Prions were found both in soil and in water from the sites, as well as in nearby fecal samples from one site.This research helps confirm longstanding suspicions that prions can accumulate in the environment in areas such as mineral licks or feeding and baiting sites where deer congregate. Scientists believe that environmental reservoirs of prions could serve as an additional transmission route of CWD, which also passes between deer through direct contact. Environmental reservoirs of prions are not expected to pose a health hazard to humans but could be a potential source of transmission to other animals.In Wisconsin, CWD is concentrated in southwestern and southeastern counties. More than 30 percent of adult male deer are infected in portions of Iowa County, according to the Department of Natural Resources. The disease is fatal and is transmitted through infectious prion proteins. It is unknown if humans can contract CWD from eating infected meat, but the World Health Organization has recommended that people avoid doing so. No cases of human transmission have been reported.The study, which was funded by the U.S. Geological Survey with support from the National Science Foundation, was published May 2 in the journal PLOS ONE. Michael Samuel, an emeritus professor of wildlife ecology, and Joel Pedersen, a professor of soil science, led the work, with colleagues in forest and wildlife ecology and the Molecular and Environmental Toxicology Center at the UW School of Medicine and Public Health.”This is the first time that anyone has demonstrated the existence of prions in naturally contaminated soil,” says Pedersen. Environmental prions have previously been shown to infect deer in heavily contaminated experimental enclosures of deer. In 2009, researchers in Colorado also identified prions in untreated water entering a water treatment plant.Related StoriesSofrito cooking technique releases healthy nutrientsScientists develop universal FACS-based approach to heterogenous cell sorting, propelling organoid researchAXT enhances cellular research product portfolio with solutions from StemBioSysThe prions were detected using a technique that amplifies the small amount of misfolded, diseased version of prion proteins isolated from soil or water samples. The misfolded varieties are added to a pool of properly folded proteins from mice engineered to produce them. The diseased folding state is transmitted to properly folded proteins, increasing the number of diseased prions and facilitating measurement.It is not clear if the quantity of soil-dwelling prions detected in the current study are sufficient to infect deer. “Although we are able to detect prions, quantifying the amount present is still difficult using this technique,” says Pedersen. Previous research by the Pedersen lab has demonstrated that soil-bound prions are more effective than free prions at infecting hamsters.”It’s a great advance for trying to understand how this disease transmits in the environment,” says Rodrigo Morales, a professor of neurology and prion researcher at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston who was not affiliated with the study. “It explains what could be the main source of (transmission).”Samuel says the significance of prion-contaminated environments in the spread and persistence of CWD among free-ranging deer remains unknown.”We know it can occur, but we just don’t know how it occurs in the wild, or how important it is relative to deer contacting each other,” says Samuel.Ten of the mineral lick sites tested in the study were artificial, while one was natural. Nine of the 11 sites were on private land and were tested with permission of the landowner.”We manage most diseases by trying to interrupt their spread. Having CWD concentrated at animal licks means that’s going to be difficult,” says Don Waller, a professor of botany and environmental studies at UW-Madison who researches Wisconsin’s deer herds and was not involved in the study.”It’s not easy to test for CWD, but this result suggests we should be looking for hot-spots of CWD prions in the environment and doing all we can to cover them up so animals can’t get to them. We may also want to do more testing in other animal species to see which may be vulnerable to CWD infection,” says Waller.last_img read more