Jarryd Hayne effect

first_imgFRU chief executive officer Radrodro Tabualevu, while applauding former Fiji Bati fullback Hayne’s selection, said it was the best news ahead of the Flying Fijians tricky opener against home team England at Twickenham.Radrodro said the FRU was confident that Hayne’s transition from professional rugby league to American Football together with all his achievements as a professional sportsman was an inspiration for the Vodafone Flying Fijians.”His achievement thus far is remarkable and manifests a nothing is impossible attitude,” he said in a media statement.”Jarryd is challenging all of us to strive beyond our comfort zone.”He is a champion and an example.”Radrodro said Hayne’s achievements sent out a strong message to locals involved in different sports around the country that if they had the right attitude then ‘sky is the limit’.Hayne played for the Fiji Bati in the 2008 Rugby League World Cup.Dubbed the Hayne-plane for his stylish celebrations after scoring tries in rugby league, the son of former Fiji Bati centre Manoa Thompson has also played for the Australian Kangaroos in international rugby league.FNRL board member Tomi Finau said Hayne was a role model for local players.”FNRL is very happy and pleased to learn that the former Vodafone Fiji Bati has been selected,” he said.”It was a big decision for him to leave NRL in the pinnacle of his career and pursue American Football. Our hope is that all players in the Vodafone Cup aspire to work hard and be like Hayne. If players put their mind to what they want, they can be successful.”Someone who was once part of the Bati has gone so far, we’re really pleased with his achievement,” Finau said.Meanwhile, Vodafone Flying Fijians head coach John McKee has enlisted retired Irish referee Alain Rolland to help his team in the run-up to the opening match of Rugby World Cup 2015 against England.Rolland spent time with the Flying Fijians at their training ground, London Irish RFC, Sunbury-on-Thames, on Friday in a continuation of a relationship that began at the Pacific Nations Cup (PNC) earlier this year. The main focus has been to improve the team’s technical awareness to cut down on the number of penalties awarded against them.”At this level a high penalty count can be very costly,” said McKee, adding he was concerned about Fiji being penalised for infringements in rucks.McKee revealed that the Fiji coaching team first spoke to Rolland before the PNC final against Samoa on August 3 which was “very beneficial”. Fiji won that match 39-29 with 12 of Samoa’s points coming from penalty conversions by Michael Stanley.Rolland’s relationship with Fiji has continued in the run-up to RWC 2015. He worked with the team ahead of their warm-up match against Canada at Twickenham Stoop on September 6.”In the Canada game our penalty count was only seven which was a significant decrease from what we had before,” said McKee.McKee added that the team had been working on aspects such as rolling away from tackles and staying on their feet.”It’s just one of many things that we do to make sure that players are very clear in the requirements of the game.”last_img read more