William Boyle, Named Pediatrician of the Year

first_imgWilliam E. Boyle, Jr, M.D., Professor of Pediatrics and of Community and Family Medicine at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center (DHMC) was recently honored with the 2003 Pediatrician of the Year awardpresented by the New Hampshire Pediatric Society.Since 1970, Boyle has been practicing his brand of family-centered,community-centered care at DHMC’s Children’s Hospital at Dartmouth (CHaD).As both a general pediatrician and a subspecialist in long-term andchronic illnesses-like cancer, diabetes, and cystic fibrosis-he has seen aspectrum of conditions far beyond those of the average pediatric practice.In July of 1997, Dr. Boyle began a community pediatrics program whichteaches doctors in training about community care and the need for childadvocacy. The William E. Boyle, Jr., M.D., Community Pediatrics Programhelps young doctors connect on a compassionate level with children andtheir family. Families of sick children often suffer devastatingemotional, financial, and sociological difficulties that arise during -and long after – treatment of a serious illness. The Boyle Programadvocates a more comprehensive approach to care – an approach in whichpediatricians look beyond the disease and see the whole child.Boyle is a 1959 graduate of Dartmouth College and finished TuftsMedical School in l963. He returned to intern at Mary Hitchcock MemorialHospital from 1963-1964 and subsequently went to Children’s Hospital inBoston as a pediatric resident from 1964-1966 and a fellow from 1969-1970,sandwiched around military service, after which he returned to the UpperValley to stay.The New Hampshire Pediatric Society is the state chapter of the AmericanAcademy of Pediatrics. Consisting of over 180 dedicated physicians fromacross the state, members serve on a host of local and state committees topromote health and health education for young people of all ages. TheNHPS advocates through the legislative process, where a pediatrician’sinput is enormously valuable when legislation comes up for discussion inthe Legislature. New Hampshire has for several years now been named thenumber one state for children to live in.CHaD is the only children’s hospital in New Hampshire. It serves all ofNH, much of Vermont and parts of Western Maine with state of the art,compassionate care for all children, regardless of a family’s ability topay. CHaD’s PainFree program has been recognized for its creativeapproach to making care and medical treatments less painful and anxietyridden for children and their families.last_img read more

Two Australian evacuees positive for virus after being cleared in Japan

first_imgJapanese health minister Katsunobu Kato challenged the Australian account, indicating some evacuees may have not been cleared.”We still don’t know the details, and to obtain details we need to communicate (with the Australian authorities), but not all the Australians who left together by a chartered flight had gotten negative test results,” he said.The Australians who left by chartered flight “include those who we recognise as people who were cleared to disembark and those who were not”.Australia’s Chief Medical Officer, Professor Brendan Murphy, said the public should not be concerned.”I just want to reassure the community that whilst this is another two cases in Australia, it’s a first for some time now. These were expected and we’re well-placed to manage them,” he said.Fifteen previous cases of coronavirus in Australia had been linked to the outbreak of the illness in China.Topics : Two Australians evacuated from the Diamond Princess cruise ship have tested positive for coronavirus on their return home despite being cleared in Japan, authorities said Friday.Health officials in Canberra told AFP all 164 Australians who returned home earlier this week were tested for COVID-19 in Japan and returned negative results.But six evacuees have since been retested, and two — described as “an older person” and “a younger person” — were found to be infected. “Those two people have mild illness,” said Dianne Stephens, acting chief health officer for the Northern Territories.Australian officials stressed the discovery was “not unexpected”, given the continued spread of the disease on the Diamond Princess after testing began.Hundreds of foreigners have been allowed to leave the ship after being cleared of the virus, but many have returned to their home countries to face further quarantine.Hundreds of cleared Japanese passengers, however, were warned only to “stay at home unless absolutely necessary”, to never use public transport, and to use a mask if they venture out.last_img read more

Overtime

first_imgBILL NEAL :09 A tip of Santa’s cap to all those who came out to the Champions First Friday—Christmas Party—Red Party…great fun was had by all and we collected a bunch of toys for “Toys for Champions.” D.J. Mean Gee was on point with the old school jams and the ladies dressed in red for the occasion were worth the price of admission to say the least…You know what I’m saying?!?! Wobbel, Wobbel!:08 Early prediction as usual. Steelers struggle early against Cleveland. You know they have that attitude problem playing down to lesser talent. But they’ll have little trouble putting away the injury plagued Bun-gels. 24-10 is the way I call it. And yes you can take it to the bank!:07 Now I am not one to say I told you so, (actually I am) but didn’t I tell you there would be NBA basketball. Yes I did. And I also told you I don’t know how or for that matter why, but these pro league walk-outs and lock-outs are making somebody a lot of money. Look I said I don’t know why…but I just got a feeling!:06 So ya wanna keep blaming Rashard Mendenhall for the problem with the Steelers’ running game. Meanwhile the Steelers have an offensive line that even “O.J.” couldn’t run through…and you all know “O.J.” can get through damn near anything! (oops, my bad!) If you give him a hole he’ll run through it. I promise you.:05 The City Game is alive and well. More than 16,000 checked in at Consol Energy Center the other night, and not a bad game to be sure. What Duquesne lacked in height they made up in heart. T.J. McConnell is the real deal and could play anywhere. The Dukes desperately need an inside presence. And even though Pitt has an inside presence…They need one too. I mean one that actually works. I am just saying.:04 The campaign is officially on. Everybody start calling the Pitt Athletic Department…in a kind and gentle way now…and start asking that they retire San Clancy’s uniform and hang it in the rafters at the Peterson Events Center along with the other legends, which he clearly is! The uniforms that are presently retired are Don Hennon, Billy Knight, Charles Smith and Brandon Knight. Now you tell me Sam “Bam” Clancy doesn’t deserve to be there.:03 I know you’ve been crying for a new Top 10 list, for goodness sake I am getting stopped in the streets about it. So hhhheeerrrreeee we go! But trust me this won’t be easy.The Top 10 Greatest Steelers of All Time: 1. Joe Greene 2. Franco Harris 3. Mel Blount 4. Terry Bradshaw 5. Lynn Swann 6. Rod Woodson 7. L. C. Greenwood 8.Jack Lambert 9. Mike Webster 10. Jack HamYou know the drill. Think you have a better list? Mail me your list (that’s right I said mail it. Don’t be so lazy.) And I’ll put yours in the paper…if it’s better. Mail to Champion Enterprises, 416 Springdale Drive, Suite 33, Pgh., PA 15235.:02 I want to take this opportunity to thank “Ms. Carol” (Carolyn Jones) from the New Pittsburgh Courier for coming to the First Friday Christmas Par-Tay even though she got lost…we’re glad you made it. It’s nice to know that some people can keep their word! Huh!:01 Hey I am done, that’s all I got…oh, hold up wait a minute…I got more. Give Hines Ward the ball mmmmmaaaannnn! Give the man his 1,000 catches. All he’s done for you is everything, including winning your last Super Bowl for ya and knocking all the other big nasty guys on their butts. C’mon man!!!Now I am done.~ Game Over ~ :10 Listen, whatever they’re putting in the milk they give the boys in Clairton and Aliquippa needs to be packaged and marketed nationwide. Are you kidding me…both of their football teams are something like 250 wins and no losses over the past five years. And let’s not talk about the last “50” years! Now run and tell Kevin Cameron I said that! last_img read more

Nisqually Land Trust Hosts Historical Nature Walk

first_imgFacebook0Tweet0Pin0 Submitted by Nisqually Land TrustThe Nisqually Land Trust is hosting a Nature Walk at its historic Van Eaton Property, along the Mashel River near Eatonville on Saturday, July 13th, from 1 – 3 p.m.The one-mile, moderate walk will be led by Land Trust staff through scenic Douglas fir forest to the former Van Eaton homestead on the banks of the Mashel, now the site of important salmon-recovery efforts led by the Land Trust and the Nisqually Indian Tribe.The Mashel is the largest salmon-producing tributary to the Nisqually River and was once one of the major steelhead-trout rivers in the Pacific Northwest. Even today, longtime Eatonville residents talk of steelhead runs so dense “you couldn’t see the river bottom.”But runs of both steelhead and Chinook salmon have declined dramatically over the past forty years, and both are now listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. Participants will learn more about restoration of the Mashel and the importance of the Van Eaton property for the future of our threatened salmon.Space is limited and registration is free but required. Contact the Nisqually Land Trust at 360-489-3400 or sjackson@nisquallylandtrust.org for more information and to register.last_img read more

Caring for Animals in Monmouth County and Beyond

first_imgLicitrasaid that “very few towns” don’t have feral cats, though it can be less noticeablein bigger municipalities. Within the last three years, he has been able tobring 15 municipalities on board to share the costs and benefits of the TNRprogram with the MCSPCA. EATONTOWN – This year, the Monmouth County Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (MCSPCA) on Wall Street will celebrate its 75th anniversary. ThatMonmouth County humane law enforcement agency had such great success that in2017 the state Legislature asked him to testify about why his model was succeedingat the MCSPCA, while other county SPCAs in the state were not. The answer? “Over theyears, the New Jersey State Legislature has spent thousands, tens of thousandsof hours writing animal cruelty law. And you left it statutorily responsible toa volunteer police department to enforce. How is that possible?” he recalledasking the state lawmakers. “You have professional career law enforcement doingthis job as opposed to the volunteers – who mean well – but 99 percent of themhave no law enforcement background,” he said. Licitra said it is important that the kittens and cats at the adoption center stay in a relaxed environment. Photo by Allison Perrine Rescuing Dogs from Korea and China Accordingto John Klein, they are “trying to change the world one dog at a time.” Housepets aren’t the only animals that require care. When in need, squirrels, deer,raccoons and more are brought to the shelter by animal control officers. Theanimals are then released back to the wild or to a wildlife rehabilitationcenter within 24 to 48 hours. Ross Licitra, director of the Monmouth County SPCA. Photo by Allison Perrine The spacewould be for wildlife rehabilitation and public use, like education programsfor children. You have to educate children when they’re young enough to understandthat wildlife is just as important as pets, Licitra said. Setting the Standard Thatbackground helped him mold the MCSPCA and its humane law enforcement agencyinto what it is today. He makes sure the MCSPCA’s agency works closely with theMonmouth County Prosecutor’s Office and that its humane law enforcement agencyis comprised of paid personnel, not volunteers, to guarantee calls areanswered. In other counties with volunteer agencies, some calls go unansweredwhen volunteers are unavailable. He made this possible with the help of SheriffShaun Golden, Arnone and the county prosecutor. With the help of No Dogs Left Behind, a global animal rescue organization, and local volunteers John and Robin Klein, the MCSPCA has taken two trips to China to rescue dogs from the Yulin Dog Meat Festival. The festival is held annually during the summer solstice and runs for about 10 days. According to No Dogs Left Behind, about 10,000 to 15,000 dogs are killed and consumed each festival, held in Yulin, Guangxi, China. Dogs are often stolen from their owners, packed onto trucks and sent to their death. Afterbeing rescued, the dogs are brought to the MCSPCA center in Eatontown. They aretaken care of, evaluated and eventually put up for adoption to a loving home. Theorganization exists to protect and advocate for domestic pets, wildlife anddomestic livestock within Monmouth County. Lately, its mission has expanded.With its partners in animal welfare, the MCSPCA wants to step in to save animalsfrom high-kill shelters throughout the southern United States and Puerto Ricoand from the meat trade in Korea and China, and lend a hand in rescue effortsduring natural disasters. Afterthat, the state Legislature disbanded the NJSPCA’s volunteer humane lawenforcement division and mandated that every county prosecutor’s office have anSPCA law enforcement division, like at the MCSPCA, Licitra said. With that,chief humane law enforcement officers – like Licitra – had to be appointed ineach county SPCA, and each municipal police department had to appoint a humanelaw enforcement officer. Additionally, all humane officers appointed had to goback to the police academy for training. The dogs were quarantined, all canine and feline adoptions were halted and veterinary services stopped. “The decision to close the shelter for adoptions and our Vogel Veterinary Care Center during one of the busiest times of the year for us was difficult, but done out of pure concern for not only the health and well-being of all our dogs, but of genuine concern for all dogs in the Monmouth County area and beyond,” said Licitra in a statement posted on the MCSPCA website Dec. 20. Beforeassuming his role as the executive director of the MCSPCA and the chief humaneofficer for the county, Licitra was a police officer. He worked locally forfive years and later joined the Monmouth County Prosecutor’s Office in 1986where he handled narcotics, gang and homicide cases. He was an officer for 30years. TheMCSPCA operates on a 30 percent profit margin. The revenue it earns helps payfor medical services at the shelter, which runs about $800,000 annually. “Thebiggest challenge for us is always funding and space,” he said. The shelter’sclosure at the holidays is expected to have a negative effect on its balancesheet. Trap, Neuter and Release, or TNR, is a program designed to control the feral cat population or, as Licitra calls them, “community cats.” Animal control personnel visit municipalities that participate in the MCSCPA’s TNR program and bring stray cats to the shelter, neuter or spay them, give them shots and clip their ear tips – which does not hurt them, he said. Then they release the stray cats back where they came from. If they are kittens, the MCSPCA keeps them and adopts them out. If they are house cats that have been abandoned, they also adopt them out. “Theytorture the dogs as much as they can and then kill them. They say it makes themeat taste better when they’re tortured,” said Licitra. Theclosest wildlife rehabilitation center is in Mercer County, but Licitra saidhe’s working on bringing one to Monmouth County with the help of Freeholder TomArnone. “The county has so many great parks and in one of the parks we’d find abuilding and we’d pay to have it all renovated,” he said. “Long Branch has been our most successful,” said Licitra. He estimated they have helped over 500 cats in Long Branch alone. It’s importantto note, however, that the MCSPCA is not funded by the county. “We are anagency created by state law and authority, but we’re self-funded,” saidLicitra. Theshelter takes in animals from New Jersey and high-kill shelters in southernstates and Puerto Rico. But recently, it turned its efforts overseas to rescueanimals in China and Korea from being tortured and killed for human consumption. Community Cats Theshelter recently rescued nine dogs from China that would have otherwise beensent to the festival. They also rescued an additional nine at the beginning of2019. In 2018, the shelter partnered with the Humane Society for the UnitedStates (HSUS) and rescued dogs from Korea that were slated for humanconsumption. The Wildlife Room TheMCSPCA works closely with the New Jersey Division of Fish and Wildlife. Ithandles regulatory incidents involving fishing, hunting and more. When animalcruelty or inhumane activity is involved, the MCSPCA steps in. In 2020,the MCSPCA will officially be the “first ever” to receive state budgetaryfunding – $25,000 – for the TNR program, thanks to state Sen. Vin Gopal, saidLicitra. He also credited Arnone as being a big supporter of the MCSCPA’s TNRprogram. This article originally appeared in the Jan. 2-9, 2020 print edition of The Two River Times. He went on to say the affected dogs were improving and he thanked the public for their “incredible amount of support.” The center reopened on Jan. 2, 2020. Theshelter ended 2019 on a sad note after it had to close for several weeks duringits busiest time of year to treat dogs with H3N2 influenza, or canine flu, anextremely contagious disease that likely arrived with a rescue transport,according to Ross Licitra, executive director of the MCSPCA. last_img read more

Fired animal-agency boss appeals to council

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORERose Parade grand marshal Rita Moreno talks New Year’s Day outfit and ‘West Side Story’ remake Villaraigosa fired the embattled Stuckey on Dec. 15 and announced that he was hiring Ed Boks, the outgoing head of New York City Animal Care and Control, as interim manager, effective Jan. 3. Lear asked for a hearing so Stuckey can address the council. Lear said Stuckey had been offered two weeks of severance pay by Villaraigosa if he agreed to resign, but Stuckey rejected that offer. Aides to the mayor indicated Stuckey asked for 11 months’ pay. Villaraigosa said that, both after becoming mayor and while he was still a City Council member and mayoral candidate, he let Stuckey know that he was dissatisfied with his performance. “I remember specifically we had a meeting up at Lake Arrowhead where we were doing disaster preparedness, and I told him, ‘My heart’s with you, but there has to be some changes made,”‘ Villaraigosa said. Ousted Animal Services Director Guerdon Stuckey appealed Wednesday to the Los Angeles City Council to overturn Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa’s decision to fire him from his $154,000-a-year post. In a two-page letter with supporting documents, Stuckey said aides to former Mayor James Hahn had offered him assurances of a longtime job or a substantial severance package when he accepted the job late last year. Stuckey’s attorney, Edward Lear, said his client performed well in his job, received compliments on his performance and was never reprimanded. “Notwithstanding the city’s representation of continued employment to Mr. Stuckey, he was terminated,” Lear wrote in his appeal to the council. “I made the decision to remove him because I felt he wasn’t doing the job.” Villaraigosa also denied he was bowing to pressure from animal-rights extremists, who often targeted Stuckey over euthanasia in city animal shelters and his lack of animal-welfare experience. “They had stopped targeting him several months ago,” Villaraigosa said. “I told them he would stay as long as there were attacks.” In listing Stuckey’s accomplishments, he and his attorney said the number of animals killed since Stuckey took office declined by 15.6 percent, the largest percentage reduction in four years. They also cited efforts to improve the treatment of animals with animal-cruelty task forces, better customer service, community outreach and better department management. Stuckey also has threatened to file a lawsuit for wrongful job termination. — Rick Orlov, (213) 978-0390 rick.orlov@dailynews.com160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more