BLOG: Failure to Fund Schools Would Result in the Loss of 23,000 Educators

first_imgBLOG: Failure to Fund Schools Would Result in the Loss of 23,000 Educators By: Megan Healey, Deputy Press Secretary SHARE Email Facebook Twitter February 22, 2016center_img Budget News,  Education,  Schools That Teach,  The Blog Pennsylvania is at a crossroads. We can fund our schools and fix our deficit or we will be faced with an additional $1 billion in cuts to education funding. This $1 billion cut will lead to the immediate layoff of 23,000 educators in Pennsylvania.In January of 2011, Gov. Corbett was inaugurated. Around this time, schools began to plan for the coming 2011/2012 school year, not anticipating there would be a budget cut. Governor Corbett’s budget cuts passed in late June of 2011 – after many schools had passed their 2011 budgets. They had prior year appropriations and were budgeting for the next school year. For the 2012 school year, they had to account for the new appropriations and cuts. Between July of 2011 and December of 2012, 23,000 educators were lost in Pennsylvania. For budgeting purposes, this is immediate. They were baked into the next school budget cycle – the cycle when the appropriation cut hit. A 2014 survey by PASA and PASBO says “data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics documents the loss of more than 23,000 education jobs in Pennsylvania through the end of 2012.”Most importantly, while it is very useful to have a historic comparison to make when we estimate the impact of a $1 billion cut to education, that estimation and its impact – whether by size of the layoffs or timing – is much different today than it was in 2011.There are three areas where local school districts can make decisions. They can cut programs. They can raise property taxes. They can reduce personnel. But the environment is significantly different today than 2011/2012.First:There are fewer programs to cut today than there were in 2011 and 2012. Since 2010/11, there have been 783 programs eliminated at schools in addition to 370 academic programs schools slated to eliminate according to a 2014 survey by PASA and PASBO. According to the survey, “the cumulative number of program eliminations and reductions is estimated to be well over 1,100 within the next school year.” Further, schools said 220 sports or extracurricular programs would either be eliminated or face a fee. This survey even adds that they might have underestimated the program cuts in schools, “This analysis may understate the depth of academic program cuts and reductions in two ways. First, substantial impacts were felt in the immediate aftermath of the financial crisis and in the first years of the recession, while this report documents program reductions only since 2010. Second, districts were asked to indicate cuts at the ‘program’ or category level—for example, ‘music/theater programs.’ Since a district could have made multiple cuts within a single program—such as marching band AND jazz band AND chorus for this example—the number of eliminations and reductions should be treated as a floor, not a ceiling.”Schools are cut to the bone and there are fewer available options for schools to cut programs in order to make up for an additional $1 billion state education cut.Second:Legislation restricted local school districts’ ability to raise property taxes to make up for cuts. This means that state level cuts are more harmful today than five years ago. There simply is not the ability to compensate. School districts that were able to replace revenue and keep teachers in 2011 and 2012 do not have that option.Act 25 of 2011 made several changes to the Taxpayer Relief Act, including reducing the number of referendum exceptions that could be requested from PDE. Exceptions that were removed were for new construction projects (academic and nonacademic projects), maintenance of local and state tax revenues, school improvement plans and health care-related benefits.In 2011-12, there were seven referendum exception. Now, there are only three – pensions, special ed and school construction. (For this, all the school construction categories are counted as one.)Third:Even before these changes, schools identified staff reductions as a preferred means – of their limited means – of balancing their budgets. According to the 2014 survey, “ninety percent of responding school districts have reduced staff, and more than 40 percent of districts have, or will, furlough classroom teachers. Reductions continue to occur among all categories of school employees.” In 2014, with balanced funding – never mind a $1 billion cut – more than one quarter of districts anticipated furloughs.Fourth:The financial environment for schools is significantly different than 2011-2012. Pennsylvania’s credit has been downgraded many times, and the school district intercept program has faced similar downgrades. This limits a school’s ability to go to the market and issue debt to make up shortfalls.July 17, 2012 – The programmatic rating of the Pennsylvania Act 150 School District Intercept Program was downgraded to A1 with a stable outlook from Aa3 with a negative outlook; the programmatic rating of the Pennsylvania School District Fiscal Agent Agreement Intercept Program was downgraded to Aa3 with a stable outlook from Aa2 with a negative outlook; and the programmatic rating on the Pennsylvania State Public School Building Authority Lease Revenue Intercept Program was downgraded to Aa3 with a stable outlook from Aa2 with a negative outlook.November 4, 2015 – Moody’s Investors Service has downgraded the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania’s (Aa3 negative) pre-default intercept programs for school districts to A3 from A2. This action affects the State Public School Building Authority Lease Revenue Intercept Program (Sec. 785) and the Pennsylvania School District Fiscal Agent Agreement Intercept Program (Sec. 633). For districts enhanced by the commonwealth’s post-default intercept program (Pennsylvania Act 150 Program), Moody’s confirms the cap, or the highest rating districts can receive due to the post-default enhancement, at A3.December 22, 2015 – Moody’s Investors Service has downgraded the school district enhancement programs of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania (Aa3 negative) to Baa1, and changed our approach to rating pre-default enhancement programs in the commonwealth. All enhanced ratings in Pennsylvania carry a negative outlook. The negative outlook is based both on the outlook for the commonwealth and the ongoing uncertainty surrounding its ability to fund the intercept programs during budget stalemates.After years of harsh and disproportionate cuts, there are districts that may be forced to close their doors before the end of this school year without the additional funding provided for in the bipartisan budget agreement and the 2016/17 proposed budget.For example, the Erie school district is facing bankruptcy right now.Put simply, 23,000 educators were lost the last time there was a $1 billion cut to education and this time there are far fewer tools in schools’ toolboxes to stave off those cuts for even an additional school year budgeting cycle.Schools – already stretched thin by years of underfunding – are at their limits. You can find updates and behind-the-scenes content on the 2016-2017 budget announcement on our Facebook and Twitter.Read more posts about Governor Wolf’s 2016-17 budget.Like Governor Tom Wolf on Facebook: Facebook.com/GovernorWolflast_img read more

Modified rookie awards are new in KSE’s 20th season as IMCA sponsor

first_imgWHITE HOUSE, Tenn. – Modified rookie of the year awards are new to KSE Racing Products’ 20th year in marketing partnership with IMCA.The high-performance parts manufacturer out of White House, Tenn., completes a second decade of sponsorship in 2016. They will be awarding their new fast ratio 700 Series steering boxes to the top rookie drivers in each of the five Xtreme Motor Sports IMCA Modified regions.KSE has also renewed the product awards and product certificates based on national standings and results of special events for Modifieds, IMCA Late Models and IMCA EMI RaceSaver Sprint Cars.The national Modified champion earns a new KSE TandemX Pump (power steering/fuel). Second through fifth place finishers in the national standings each get $200 product certificates while sixth through 10th place drivers re­ceive $100 product certificates.A Gen2 power steering gear will be awarded to the National Sprint Car champion. Second through 10th place drivers in national standings for that division receive $100 product certificates.Additionally, designated place finishers at 50 special events for Modifieds, Late Models and Sprint Cars earn product certificates of the same value.Certificates will be mailed from the IMCA home office or presented during the national awards banquet.“The steering boxes are a new product for KSE and we wanted to target new drivers to the division and offer them a great incentive for a rookie of the year award,” noted IMCA Marketing Director Kevin Yoder. “Hopefully we’ll be able to renew the program year after year and continually inspire new Xtreme Motor Sports IMCA Modified drivers to achieve their highest goals.”For additional product information, visit KSE’s website at www.kse-racing.com, call 615 672-5117 or follow them on Facebook and Twitter.“KSE is proud to be onboard again as a marketing partner with IMCA for our 20th season and we’re excited about the new rookie of the year awards. KSE originally started in Northwest Iowa so IMCA Modifieds have always been a major focus of our product development,” said KSE Vice President and Product Engineer Daniel Korrect.“With the latest introduction of our new steering box, KSE now offers all major products for a complete, high quality power steering system dedicated to open wheel Modifieds,” he continued.”We’re definitely looking forward to the coming season and we’ve got several additional new products in development so please make sure to watch out for new product releases from KSE.”last_img read more

Middle Tenn. looks to end streak vs Southern Miss

first_imgSUPER SENIORS: Middle Tennessee has relied heavily on its seniors. C.J. Jones, Antonio Green, Donovan Sims and Jayce Johnson have collectively accounted for 65 percent of the team’s scoring this year and 67 percent of all Blue Raiders points over the team’s last five games.FUELING THE OFFENSE: Gabe Watson has either made or assisted on 44 percent of all Southern Miss field goals over the last three games. The sophomore guard has 14 field goals and 21 assists in those games.WINLESS WHEN: Southern Miss is 0-12 this year when it scores 65 points or fewer and 9-6 when it scores at least 66.PERFECT WHEN: Southern Miss is a perfect 7-0 when it scores at least 74 points. The Golden Eagles are 2-18 when scoring any fewer than that.DID YOU KNOW: Middle Tennessee has averaged only 74.8 points per game over its last five games. The Blue Raiders are giving up 81.6 points per game over that stretch. Middle Tenn. looks to end streak vs Southern Miss Associated Press February 20, 2020center_img Share This StoryFacebookTwitteremailPrintLinkedinRedditMiddle Tennessee (6-21, 2-12) vs. Southern Miss (9-18, 5-9)Reed Green Coliseum, Hattiesburg, Mississippi; Saturday, 1 p.m. ESTBOTTOM LINE: Southern Miss looks to extend Middle Tennessee’s conference losing streak to five games. Middle Tennessee’s last CUSA win came against the UTSA Roadrunners 83-80 on Feb. 1. Southern Miss is coming off a 75-67 win over Florida International in its most recent game. ___For more AP college basketball coverage: https://apnews.com/Collegebasketball and http://twitter.com/AP_Top25___This was generated by Automated Insights, http://www.automatedinsights.com/ap, using data from STATS LLC, https://www.stats.comlast_img read more