Popcaan adds $100K bonus to Digicel Grand Prix Finals

first_imgKINGSTON:In addition to his highly anticipated performance at the Digicel Grand Prix finals on Saturday, popular dancehall artiste Popcaan is also pledging $100,000 in cash, which will be awarded to the top two schools in the Digicel Grand Prix Athletic Championships.”I have been hearing a lot about the Digicel Grand Prix and everything they’re doing for the young athletes and their schools, so I wanted to be a part of that,” Popcaan said. “So, in addition to the other prizes, I will be giving the top male and female schools $50,000 each to continue the development of their track and field teams.”I want to also encourage students to continue to pursue non-traditional career paths such as track and field and entertainment, especially with Jamaica’s growing dominance in these fields worldwide,” he added.Sponsorship manager of Digicel, Danielia McLean, welcomed the announcement.”We’re very excited to have Popcaan on board to close the 2016 Grand Prix series and celebrate the performance of our young athletes,” said McLean.”The development of the schools’ athletics programme and Jamaica’s track and field industry overall is something that we all have a part to play in, so Popcaan’s contribution will also go a far way in helping us to achieve the main goal of this initiative,” she added.The month-long series will end with a grand finale this Saturday at the G.C. Foster Classics in St Catherine. The top performing boys’ and girls’ schools will each receive $1m in gym equipment from Digicel and the most improved boys and girls’ school will each receive $125,000 in cash from GraceKennedy. Honey Bun will also be providing $100,000 cash towards for the athlete nutrition programme at each of the winning schools.The grand finale will feature exciting performances, a major surprise, plus a party stand. Tickets to the event will cost $500 for adults and $300 for children. Patrons can gain access to the party stand by purchasing a $300 Flex Card at the gate.The Digicel Grand Prix Athletics Championship is sponsored by SportsMax, GraceKennedy, CB Chicken, KFC, Gatorade, Pure National Ice, Honey Bun and Logo Stitch.last_img read more

Sentenced to life

first_imgTricia Van Voorhis, who is three years younger than Robin, berated Marshall for his lack of guilt or remorse. “It is beyond my comprehension how you can do this in the first place. But how can you live with yourself after?” Van Voorhis said she hopes he spends “day after day and year after year” in his cell thinking about the pain he’s caused. Kim Hoynes, the oldest sister, recalled how her sister’s murder devastated her parents. Their father, who suffered from emphysema, committed suicide a decade later. Their mother, who now has many of her own health problems, grieved quietly. Wendy Castaneda, the youngest sister, spoke of how she continues to grieve for her “best friend.” “The truth is you can never make restitution for your actions because you can never bring Robin back,” she said to Marshall. All the sisters remembered how Robin had dedicated much of her life to her church and religion. Castaneda also acknowledged Marshall’s faith as he brought a Bible to court every day. “If you truly believe and embrace the truth of the Bible … then I have to believe that at least you’re sorry for what you did and would express that to my family.” Marshall had worked with Robin at the restaurant until shortly before her Oct. 30, 1984, murder. The assistant manager was fired for a number of reasons, including suspicions he was stealing from the restaurant. Robin, who was alone doing paperwork after closing, let Marshall in. She was expecting him to turn in his uniform and pick up a briefcase he left behind. When she turned away from him, he stabbed her twice in the back. He tried to open a floor safe, but the combination had been changed. Before he left, he slit her throat. When he was first arrested on Nov. 10, 1984, he had two knives and gloves with him and was wearing camouflage pants and boots. The boots, which were kept by the Torrance Police Department when Marshall was released, later became a key piece of evidence in the case. A piece of foam found at the murder scene was linked to the boots. On Friday before the judge handed down the sentence, Arnold said he was “saddened” for the way Marshall “eviscerated” Robin’s close-knit and loving family and shortened a life that was bound for great things. denise.nix@dailybreeze.com (310) 543-6111 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREGame Center: Chargers at Kansas City Chiefs, Sunday, 10 a.m.And not when Torrance Superior Court Judge Mark Arnold told him he was “evil,” and sent him to prison for the rest of his life without the possibility of parole. Marshall, 46, a former state Department of Forestry fire captain, did briefly glance at his family before he was led away by bailiffs. Neither Marshall, his attorney nor his family members spoke during the sentencing hearing. However, his attorney said he would appeal the conviction and sentence. A jury convicted Marshall on Oct. 5 of murder and the special circumstance of killing during an attempted robbery. On Friday, Robin’s sisters told how their lives changed with her death. They lamented the special occasions, rites of passage and everyday joys they were robbed of sharing with her. William Marshall sat in court Friday staring at a black leather Bible on the table in front of him with his hands chained to his waist. He never once looked up. Not when Robin Hoynes’ sisters described the hole he tore in their family by killing her 23 years ago. Not when the prosecutor reiterated the “heinous, horrible” murder of the 21-year-old Whittier woman at a Kentucky Fried Chicken restaurant in Torrance. last_img read more