Floods displace over 19,000 Greater Jakarta residents: BNPB

first_imgThousands of Jakarta residents are seeking refuge following widespread following, the National Disaster Mitigation Agency (BNPB) has said.As of Wednesday, the BNPB’s command center recorded 19,901 displaced residents throughout 214 subdistricts in Greater Jakarta, with East Jakarta as the most affected area. The refugee shelters are located in 11 regencies and municipalities across the region, including Central Jakarta, North Jakarta, West Jakarta, South Jakarta, East Jakarta; Bekasi regency and Bekasi, West Java; and Tangerang, South Tangerang and Karawang regency in Banten. A total of 74,452 individuals, some 22,405 families, have been affected by the floods.  “The water levels in the affected areas vary from 5 to 100 centimeters. In some parts of East Jakarta, the water level remains at 100 cm,” BNPB spokesperson Agus Wibowo said in a statement on Wednesday. The command center has also recorded five deaths and three missing people in relation to the flooding. The fatalities were residents of Bekasi, East Jakarta, West Jakarta, and South Tangerang respectively, while two of the missing people are from Bekasi and one is from South Tangerang.  Topics :last_img read more

BLOG: Failure to Fund Schools Would Result in the Loss of 23,000 Educators

first_imgBLOG: Failure to Fund Schools Would Result in the Loss of 23,000 Educators By: Megan Healey, Deputy Press Secretary SHARE Email Facebook Twitter February 22, 2016center_img Budget News,  Education,  Schools That Teach,  The Blog Pennsylvania is at a crossroads. We can fund our schools and fix our deficit or we will be faced with an additional $1 billion in cuts to education funding. This $1 billion cut will lead to the immediate layoff of 23,000 educators in Pennsylvania.In January of 2011, Gov. Corbett was inaugurated. Around this time, schools began to plan for the coming 2011/2012 school year, not anticipating there would be a budget cut. Governor Corbett’s budget cuts passed in late June of 2011 – after many schools had passed their 2011 budgets. They had prior year appropriations and were budgeting for the next school year. For the 2012 school year, they had to account for the new appropriations and cuts. Between July of 2011 and December of 2012, 23,000 educators were lost in Pennsylvania. For budgeting purposes, this is immediate. They were baked into the next school budget cycle – the cycle when the appropriation cut hit. A 2014 survey by PASA and PASBO says “data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics documents the loss of more than 23,000 education jobs in Pennsylvania through the end of 2012.”Most importantly, while it is very useful to have a historic comparison to make when we estimate the impact of a $1 billion cut to education, that estimation and its impact – whether by size of the layoffs or timing – is much different today than it was in 2011.There are three areas where local school districts can make decisions. They can cut programs. They can raise property taxes. They can reduce personnel. But the environment is significantly different today than 2011/2012.First:There are fewer programs to cut today than there were in 2011 and 2012. Since 2010/11, there have been 783 programs eliminated at schools in addition to 370 academic programs schools slated to eliminate according to a 2014 survey by PASA and PASBO. According to the survey, “the cumulative number of program eliminations and reductions is estimated to be well over 1,100 within the next school year.” Further, schools said 220 sports or extracurricular programs would either be eliminated or face a fee. This survey even adds that they might have underestimated the program cuts in schools, “This analysis may understate the depth of academic program cuts and reductions in two ways. First, substantial impacts were felt in the immediate aftermath of the financial crisis and in the first years of the recession, while this report documents program reductions only since 2010. Second, districts were asked to indicate cuts at the ‘program’ or category level—for example, ‘music/theater programs.’ Since a district could have made multiple cuts within a single program—such as marching band AND jazz band AND chorus for this example—the number of eliminations and reductions should be treated as a floor, not a ceiling.”Schools are cut to the bone and there are fewer available options for schools to cut programs in order to make up for an additional $1 billion state education cut.Second:Legislation restricted local school districts’ ability to raise property taxes to make up for cuts. This means that state level cuts are more harmful today than five years ago. There simply is not the ability to compensate. School districts that were able to replace revenue and keep teachers in 2011 and 2012 do not have that option.Act 25 of 2011 made several changes to the Taxpayer Relief Act, including reducing the number of referendum exceptions that could be requested from PDE. Exceptions that were removed were for new construction projects (academic and nonacademic projects), maintenance of local and state tax revenues, school improvement plans and health care-related benefits.In 2011-12, there were seven referendum exception. Now, there are only three – pensions, special ed and school construction. (For this, all the school construction categories are counted as one.)Third:Even before these changes, schools identified staff reductions as a preferred means – of their limited means – of balancing their budgets. According to the 2014 survey, “ninety percent of responding school districts have reduced staff, and more than 40 percent of districts have, or will, furlough classroom teachers. Reductions continue to occur among all categories of school employees.” In 2014, with balanced funding – never mind a $1 billion cut – more than one quarter of districts anticipated furloughs.Fourth:The financial environment for schools is significantly different than 2011-2012. Pennsylvania’s credit has been downgraded many times, and the school district intercept program has faced similar downgrades. This limits a school’s ability to go to the market and issue debt to make up shortfalls.July 17, 2012 – The programmatic rating of the Pennsylvania Act 150 School District Intercept Program was downgraded to A1 with a stable outlook from Aa3 with a negative outlook; the programmatic rating of the Pennsylvania School District Fiscal Agent Agreement Intercept Program was downgraded to Aa3 with a stable outlook from Aa2 with a negative outlook; and the programmatic rating on the Pennsylvania State Public School Building Authority Lease Revenue Intercept Program was downgraded to Aa3 with a stable outlook from Aa2 with a negative outlook.November 4, 2015 – Moody’s Investors Service has downgraded the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania’s (Aa3 negative) pre-default intercept programs for school districts to A3 from A2. This action affects the State Public School Building Authority Lease Revenue Intercept Program (Sec. 785) and the Pennsylvania School District Fiscal Agent Agreement Intercept Program (Sec. 633). For districts enhanced by the commonwealth’s post-default intercept program (Pennsylvania Act 150 Program), Moody’s confirms the cap, or the highest rating districts can receive due to the post-default enhancement, at A3.December 22, 2015 – Moody’s Investors Service has downgraded the school district enhancement programs of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania (Aa3 negative) to Baa1, and changed our approach to rating pre-default enhancement programs in the commonwealth. All enhanced ratings in Pennsylvania carry a negative outlook. The negative outlook is based both on the outlook for the commonwealth and the ongoing uncertainty surrounding its ability to fund the intercept programs during budget stalemates.After years of harsh and disproportionate cuts, there are districts that may be forced to close their doors before the end of this school year without the additional funding provided for in the bipartisan budget agreement and the 2016/17 proposed budget.For example, the Erie school district is facing bankruptcy right now.Put simply, 23,000 educators were lost the last time there was a $1 billion cut to education and this time there are far fewer tools in schools’ toolboxes to stave off those cuts for even an additional school year budgeting cycle.Schools – already stretched thin by years of underfunding – are at their limits. You can find updates and behind-the-scenes content on the 2016-2017 budget announcement on our Facebook and Twitter.Read more posts about Governor Wolf’s 2016-17 budget.Like Governor Tom Wolf on Facebook: Facebook.com/GovernorWolflast_img read more

Republic-England friendly date set

first_imgEngland will take on the Republic of Ireland in a friendly next June, the Football Association of Ireland (FAI) and the Football Association (FA) have jointly announced. The fixture will take place at the Aviva Stadium on June 7, a week before the Three Lions face Slovenia in their European Championship qualifier. It will be the first time that England have played in Dublin since crowd trouble caused the referee to abandon a friendly between the two sides in 1995 after 27 minutes. The Republic tackle Scotland in a Euro 2016 qualifier on Saturday, June 13. The Lansdowne Road riot was one of the darkest episodes in the history of English football. Right-wing extremists among the England supporters in the ground’s upper west stand threw objects onto the pitch when David Kelly had given the Irish the lead. The referee took the players off the pitch moments later and they never returned. Bridges were rebuilt last May when the Republic came to Wembley to play a friendly which they drew 1-1. The match passed off without any crowd trouble. The two nations have faced each other 14 times before, England winning five and losing two, while the other seven matches were drawn. Club England Managing Director Adrian Bevington welcomed the announcement of next summer’s friendly. He said: “While inevitably the focus for Roy and his team is on Brazil and the World Cup, we are always planning further ahead and we are delighted to announce this fixture next summer. “We have had recent visits to France to begin initial plans for that tournament, and our friendly matches will also form a key part in the qualification campaign and preparation. “It will be a significant moment for England to play in Dublin again, and due to the hard work by both organisations on many fronts we fully expect it to be a fantastic occasion enjoyed by both sets of fans.” The game is likely to be a 50,000 sell out, but no decision has been made on how the tickets will be allocated. The FA and FAI are confident there will be no repeat of the trouble that marred the fixture 19 years ago. It is understood that intelligence on potential trouble-causers will be shared between the police forces of both nations. The chances of trouble occurring are lessened by the expectation that most – if not all – tickets will go to members of official fans’ groups, rather than via general sale. The FA said there were no arrests for football-related violence around the 1-1 draw last year, which was organised as part of the organisation’s 150th anniversary celebrations. Both national anthems were largely well-respected and it is hoped that the same will happen again this time around. Press Associationlast_img read more

Fort Lauderdale police officer suspended after pushing woman

first_imgA Fort Lauderdale police officer has been suspended from his job after video surfaced showing him pushing a kneeling protester during Sunday night’s demonstration.Fort Lauderdale Police Chief Rick Maglione announced the decision on Monday stating:“That officer has been removed from any contact with the public,” said Maglione. “He is relieved from duty basically while this matter is investigated. It is going to be investigated first and foremost to see if any Florida statutes were violated. In other words, a criminal investigation is going to commence that the Florida Department of Law Enforcement is going to do. It’s not unusual in a case of police use of force.”Witnesses say the incident is what started a confrontation between protesters and police officers that ended in a riot.Several police cars, buildings, and businesses were left severely damaged.Maglione stated that while he does not believe the officer’s actions started the riot, his action may have escalated the situation.last_img read more