Bulldogs And Twisters Win Boys Tennis Sectional Openers

first_imgThe Batesville Varsity Tennis Team defeated Milan 5-0 on Wednesday to advance to the semifinals of the Sectional Tournament.Batevsville will play East Central on Thursday at 5 PM at South Dearborn High School. On the other side of the bracket, Oldenburg Academy defeated Lawrenceburg and will play South Dearborn Thursday at 5 PM. The winners will advance to the Sectional Championship on Saturday.#1 Singles- Beau Brown defeated Dean Elrod 6-0, 6-3#2 Singles- Blake Walsman defeated Luke Rehn 6-2, 6-2#3 Singles- Ben Schwettman defeated Jared Burton 6-1, 6-1#1 Doubles- Matt Taylor and Spencer Rose defeated Travis Butte and Sam Rehn 6-4, 3-6, 6-4#2 Doubles- Harsh Patel and Paul Ritter defeated Paul Hawk and Josh Bixler 6-0, 6-1Batesville is now 16-4 on the season.The Oldenburg Academy Twisters defeated The Lawrenceburg Tigers 4-1.Courtesy of Bulldogs Coach Mike McKinney.last_img read more

“Horse Racing: A Family Affair” will be the featured program at the Sumner County Historical and Genealogical Society meeting.

first_imgSubmitted to Sumner Newscow — On Monday, November 25th, Joyce Church, retired teacher and former girl jockey will present the program, “Horse Racing: A Family Affair,” to Sumner County Historical and Genealogical Society members and guests at 6:30 p.m., at the Wellington Senior Center, 308 S. Washington, Wellington. Visitors are welcome; no charge for the program. For possible weather cancellations, contact SCHGS President Jane Moore at 620-447-3266.In 1946, wearing maroon and pink racing silks, a skullcap, and wielding a bat, fourteen-year-old Joyce Riggs Church began her short career as a ‘bush’ jockey, racing her father’s thoroughbreds on small ‘bush’ tracks. Church and her sister raced in several Kansas towns, including their home town of Conway Springs, Anthony, Burden, Garden City, Emporia, and many other towns in Kansas, Oklahoma, Nebraska, New Mexico, Missouri and Illinois.Church, a genealogist, was surprised to find that breeding horses and racing them was ‘in their genes.’ Her research turned up that not only had her grandfather bred and sold mules by the train car load, ancestors before him had also bred mules and pacing and trotting horses.“Dad grew up in that atmosphere,” Church said, adding that it was her father’s dream to breed and race thoroughbreds and after her folks bought four colts and a stallion from a man in Fairfax, Oklahoma, her father needed jockeys, so he enlisted the help of his two daughters.“Mother never wanted us to ride,” Church said, adding that although her father allowed them to race, her parents were very protective and she and her sister were not allowed to hang out with other jockeys in the barns where there was drinking and gambling.“Racing was a family affair,” Church said, adding that the entire family traveled to the races with the horses. The horses traveled in the back of a wheat truck, and her mother drove the car.Church said that her mother packed picnic baskets with fried chicken and cherry pie, and the family picnicked on the race track grounds, and often spent the night in the back of the wheat truck with a tarp strung over the stock racks to keep off the rain.Although Church went off to college when she was 16 years old, she came home on weekends to race, and at times lived at home and drove back and forth to school at Friends so that she could continue to ride. Church stopped racing when she was twenty-nine years old, and married in 1963.“Before that, I ran around so much I didn’t have time to get married,” Church said.Church said she “had had some accidents,” and been knocked out and taken to the hospital by ambulance, but had never broken a bone. But Church added that 1976 was a bad year for the Riggs family when her sister was killed in June at Churchill Downs at the age of 37, and her father died later that year.Church will bring photographs and other racing memorabilia to share with the group, as well as the book “The Boys From the Bushes” by Lou Dean, a book about ‘bush racing’ that shares stories from Church and other ‘Bush’ jockeys. Close Forgot password? Please put in your email: Send me my password! Close message Login This blog post All blog posts Subscribe to this blog post’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Subscribe to this blog’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Follow the discussion Comment (1) Logging you in… Close Login to IntenseDebate Or create an account Username or Email: Password: Forgot login? Cancel Login Close WordPress.com Username or Email: Password: Lost your password? Cancel Login Dashboard | Edit profile | Logout Logged in as Admin Options Disable comments for this page Save Settings Sort by: Date Rating Last Activity Loading comments… You are about to flag this comment as being inappropriate. Please explain why you are flagging this comment in the text box below and submit your report. The blog admin will be notified. Thank you for your input. 0 Vote up Vote down Jasper Snellings · 350 weeks ago Gentlemen, I am doing research concerning the race tracks during the 1820’s in Sumner County. Being more specific, I am looking for Governor William Carroll’s involvement with the Allen’s (John Allen to be specific) and General Andrew Jackson. Do you have any historical records of their involvement in horse racing in Sumner County or the area where horse racing was held. It at that time was a great social gathering place to meet and in addition race their horses. I know JohnAllen and Andrew Jackson were involved, because they were close friends. An addition point, all 3 were involved with each other in the War of 1812 and the Battle of Horseshoe Bend (Alabama). Your response by email with any record(s) of tangible evidence of their racing connections would be appreciated! Jasper Snellings Report Reply 0 replies · active 350 weeks ago Post a new comment Enter text right here! Comment as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments Comments by IntenseDebate Enter text right here! Reply as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Cancel Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new commentslast_img read more

Fresh Impacts Viewed on Mars, Moon

first_img(Visited 19 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 New impacts observed on the moon and Mars allow space scientists to learn about crater formation in near real time.  What conclusions can be drawn?MoonFlash shot:  On March 17, a flash was reported on the moon by NASA cameras (see video clip on Space.com).  The object was the size of a small boulder going 56,000 miles per hour.  The crater is estimated to be 65 feet wide.  It was the brightest of 300 such impacts seen, by a factor of ten, since NASA monitoring lunar impacts in 2005.  The video clip states, “Lunar meteor showers have turned out to be more common than anyone expected.”  About 55% come from known meteor swarms; the others are random stragglers.The Earth’s atmosphere protects us from many such objects, but the fireball over Russia last Feb. 15 (Space.com), made by an object estimated to be 50 feet across (50 times larger than the lunar impactor), made big news as the biggest meteoroid to hit Earth in more than a century.MarsOrbiting spacecraft like the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) are allowing planetary scientists to gather “ground truth” data about meteoroid impact rates on another planet.  A press release from the University of Arizona discussed the 250 fresh craters detected by the high-resolution camera on MRO, based on before-and-after images.  Even though this implies hundreds of hits per year, the rate is lower than expected:Taking before and after pictures of Martian terrain, researchers of the UA-led HiRISE imaging experiment have identified almost 250 fresh impact craters on the Red Planet. The results suggest Mars gets pummeled by space rocks less frequently than previously thought, as scientists relied on cratering rates of the moon for their estimates.Can the new data provide any information on the age of Mars?  “Estimates of the rate at which new craters appear serve as scientists’ best yardstick for estimating the ages of exposed landscape surfaces on Mars and other worlds,” the article says.  There are, however, many variables to consider.  Meteoroids span a whole range of sizes, from dust particles to asteroid-size, each with its own probability of impact.  Objects above a certain threshold can spawn secondary impacts (9/25/07), making date calculations essentially unreliable (see 5/22/12)Today’s rates, furthermore, cannot be extrapolated into the distant past without making unverifiable assumptions.  So when Alfred McEwen says, “Mars now has the best-known current rate of cratering in the solar system,” he can only speak authoritatively of knowledge in the observational period of the space program.In addition to the major problem of secondaries, consider other complications when making calculations of crater rates and dates: speed of the impactor, angle of impact, gravity of the target, composition of the impactor and the target surface (e.g., porosity), atmospheric drag, magnetic field, sunlight pressure, focusing effects of other orbiting bodies.  Above all else it is impossible to know whether impact rates have been episodic.  One major swarm can throw all the dates off.  Planetary scientists try to infer a “Late Heavy Bombardment” from lunar data, but as we have seen, that inference is not without critics (4/26/12, 1/09/12, 9/17/10, 2/16/10).By analogy, there are rivers in large canyons (including the Grand Canyon and, at Mt. St. Helens, Loowit Canyon) that did not carve the canyons—the rivers are relicts of catastrophic events.  Modern viewers might look at these canyons and conclude that the canyons formed by slow, gradual erosion over long periods of time, but we know from Mt. St. Helens that is not true.  The Yellowstone fossil forests were similarly thought to have taken eons of slow processes, but now are thought to represent catastrophic deposits.So when you look at a crater-filled moon or Mars, or any of the other bodies in the solar system, you cannot know just from the number of craters how old the surface is, no matter what the textbooks and TV documentaries say.  If you won’t take our word for it, look at what Xiao and Strom said in Icarus a year ago (5/22/12).last_img read more

Maine Gets Another Passive House Multifamily Project

first_imgThe Largest Passivhaus Building in the U.S.Multifamily Passivhaus Project Starts in OregonPassivhaus Apartment Complex Would be a GiantPassivhaus Townhouses Are Underway in PhiladelphiaA Passivhaus Multifamily in Maine Nears Completion RELATED ARTICLES Passive House, but no room for frillsPassive House construction necessarily includes more insulation than conventional buildings, high-quality windows, and careful air-sealing, all of which can easily drive up costs. To stay within strict budget guidelines, Bayside developers looked for ways to trim unnecessary building elements — and that started with parking. Arguing that area residents owned fewer vehicles than average, developers successfully petitioned the city to overlook parking-space requirements that normally would have applied. (The building sits on what was a parking lot).The site is over a layer of marine clay, which is inherently weak. Designers worked to keep the building as light as possible, allowing it to rest on a floating concrete slab without the need to sink pilings for extra support.Project architect Jesse Thompson led a tour of the partially complete building in June, the last such tour on this year’s passivhausMAINE schedule.Interior finishes are simple: painted drywall, vinyl flooring, basic kitchen cabinets. Designers shrank interior hallways to bare minimums, and revisited building details repeatedly to look for potential savings.“The building got simpler and simpler as we went along,” Thompson said.While he and others working on Bayside might have preferred a few more upscale finishes inside, it just wasn’t going to happen with a minimal budget that had been set three years earlier. If kitchens got bargain cabinets with drawers that were stapled together, so be it. “Every dollar in there shows up very quickly,” Thompson said. “There’s no tolerance for glamorous here.”Designers did, however, manage to find enough money to keep vinyl siding off the building’s exterior. Instead, it will get fiber-cement cladding over a ventilated rainscreen gap.On the construction side, Wright-Ryan recognized that the longer builders were on site, the higher construction costs would be. Its construction managers, drawing on their experience at the Brewer Passive House project, looked for ways to speed up the process. They divided the building into sections, each with its own set of deadlines, to improve efficiency. Exterior walls are panelized rather than built on site. Even small steps helped: So workers would not have to sort through stacks of drywall to find the right thickness for a particular application, Wright-Ryan simply specified 5/8-inch wallboard throughout the building.If developers hit the November 21 completion date for the 38,500-square-foot building, it will mean a construction schedule of about 10 months. Many single-family homes, Thompson pointed out, take longer than that. Although construction started in January, Bayside Anchor has been in the works since 2013. That year it won a national competition, sponsored by Deutsche Bank, for innovative designs for affordable housing.Finding ways to cut costs has never been far from the minds of its developers, and efforts have paid off. The building will come in at $142 a square foot, project architect Jesse Thompson told a group touring the building recently, “substantially less” than the norm for new Portland housing. At the same time, residents will be getting the benefits of Passive House construction: low energy bills, high indoor air quality, and a superinsulated building envelope that will keep them comfortable.“You’ve got affordability baked into the building forever,” Thompson said. On November 21, three days before Thanksgiving, developers plan to complete Bayside Anchor, a mixed-use apartment building in Portland, Maine, built to meet the Passive House + 2015 standard on what amounts to a shoestring budget.The 45-unit building, about one-third complete, is located in the city’s Bayside neighborhood, a part of the city carved in half by a 1960s urban renewal project. It will contain mostly affordable one-bedroom apartments, plus a few two-bedroom and studio units. The ground floor also will house an office of the Portland Housing Authority, a Head Start program, and a police substation, making it a community hub and giving it its name, Bayside Anchor.Behind the project are the Portland Housing Authority and Avesta Housing, a private non-profit developer of affordable housing. The $7.6 million project is being financed mainly with low-income housing tax credits through MaineHousing, a state housing agency. The project was designed by Kaplan Thompson Architects of Portland. Wright-Ryan, which earlier this year finished a Passive House multifamily in Brewer, Maine, is the general contractor.center_img The PHIUS standard is ideal for multifamily projectsInsulation R-values may seem low for a Passive House project, but Thompson said that’s because a large multifamily building has proportionally less outside wall area for a given volume than does a single-family house.“People are used to seeing PHIUS + and Passivhaus single-family houses with very large R-values,” he said. “Passivhaus was invented as a multifamily program in Europe. It was not a single-family construction program. The numbers work so well in multifamily. In Germany, the first Passivhaus was a townhouse, and the middle unit in a town house has two walls that face neighbors — they don’t touch the outside air.“You think of a middle floor apartment at Bayside Anchor and it’s got one outside wall. It’s 24 feet long and 8 feet tall,” Thompson continued. “So, thermally, it’s just incredibly easy because your ratio of house to walls is tiny.”Heat loss from the building is one-third through the enclosure, one-third from the ventilation equipment, and one-third though the windows, Thompson said. In a single-family house, the numbers are very different, with ventilation losses only 10% to 15% of the total.As a result , the 75% efficiency for Bayside’s ERVs is very important for overall building performance, especially with something like 2,000 to 2,500 cubic feet of air per minute moving through the building around the clock. With an ERV that efficient, when it’s 0°F outside, and 70°F inside, incoming air is in the mid-50s. It doesn’t take much energy to boost that to the set point. On a 30°F day, incoming air is in the low 60s. “Very little heat is needed to bring it up to a good temperature,” he said. Double-stud walls, and nix the OSBExterior walls consist of a structural 2×6 wall and an inner 2×4 wall with a 1-inch gap between the two. Wall cavities will be insulated with dense-packed cellulose, with a layer of CertainTeed’s MemBrain on the interior to control vapor and air movement.Thompson said that plans call for plywood sheathing on the exterior of the building rather than oriented strand board because plywood is more durable and more weather-tolerant during construction. Seams between sheets of plywood are sealed, and the entire outer surface is treated with a liquid-applied air barrier, Defendair 200, a mostly silicone product made by Dow Corning.When it came to windows, designers considered a range of products before settling on triple-glazed units with PVC frames made by Kohltech, a Canadian manufacturer. Passive House buildings often get European tilt-and-turn windows, but in this case designers chose a mix of casements and fixed-glass units, in part to meet requirements of the Department of Housing and Urban Development.As Thompson explained, Bayside Anchor will be required to provide air conditioning to any tenant who can present proof of a medical need. By using outward-opening casements, a tenant could use an air conditioner that sits on the floor and vents through a plexiglass insert in the window opening, thus meeting the HUD requirement, without installing AC for the whole building or investing in ductless minisplit heat pumps.Windows specs are the same throughout the building, with a solar heat gain coefficient of 0.40. The Kohltech units averaged about $30 per square foot.Other building details:Insulation. In addition to the dense-packed cellulose in the walls (about R-32), there are 8 inches of polyiso rigid insulation on top of the roof deck (R-50), and 3 inches of sub-slab expanded polystyrene. There is no spray foam in the building other than what was used to seal the rim joists between floors.Ventilation. Each floor has two RenewAire energy-recovery ventilators to supply each apartment with fresh air. The units, which operate continuously, are 75% efficient. Kitchens have recirculating hoods that are not vented to the outside.Space heat. Each apartment is heated with strips of electric baseboard that cost a total of $30,000. The bill to heat the entire building is projected at about $5,000 a year, Thompson said.Airtightness. Although the standard for the German Passivhaus standard is 0.6 air changes per hour at a pressure difference of 50 pascals (ach50), the PHIUS + 2015 standard uses a different metric: 0.05 cubic feet per minute per square foot of gross envelope area at 50 pascals. When this is translated to ach50, it becomes 0.37. Need for housing is very strongJay Waterman, development director for the Portland Housing Authority, said that Bayside Anchor will be both a catalyst for more development and a hub for the community. The area was completely changed by construction of Franklin Arterial, a main thoroughfare linking Interstate-295 on the west side of town and upscale Old Port, with its shops and restaurants, on the east.“It was small streets, a grid-patterned working-class neighborhood for many, many years, and then through urban renewal, Franklin cut a swath so the tourists could get over to the Old Port and people were displaced,” Waterman said. “It became more of a service center and industrial and lower income neighborhood, and I would say it’s still on its way up.”The demand for housing is strong in the Portland area. Bayside Anchor, while significant for the neighborhood, won’t put much of a dent in it.“Let’s put it this way,” Waterman said. “There is effectively a 0% vacancy rate in Portland right now and the city would like to have 2,000 more housing units built in the next four years. We’re doing 45, so it’s a real drop in the bucket compared to the demand.”last_img read more