SHARKEY, PHILIP F.

first_img62, of Brick passed away on, September 5, 2017 at Ocean Medical Center in Brick. Philip was born and raised in Bayonne and has resided at the Jersey Shore for many years. Mr. Sharkey worked for many years at the Hess Oil Refinery in Perth Amboy before retiring in 2011. Mr. Sharkey was predeceased by his parents, Joseph and Doris Sharkey; and by his brother, Neil Sharkey. Surviving are his brother, Joseph Sharkey and his wife, Susan; nephews, Shawn Sharkey and his wife, Kristy and Joseph Sharkey; nieces, Christina Sharkey and her husband, Brian Brown and Lauren Rose and her husband, Pat. He also leaves a great nephew, Jack Rose. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made in his name to the St. Jude’s Children Research Foundation. Funeral arrangements of O’BRIEN Funeral Home, 505 Burnt Tavern Rd., Brick.last_img read more

Organ Freeman & The Turkuaz Horns Announce Brooklyn Show

first_imgWest Coast-based power-jazz/funk trio Organ Freeman is heading east for a special show in New York City, and they’re bringing some funky friends with them. Organ Freeman & The Turkuaz Horns will hold court at Brooklyn’s Knitting Factory for one night only on Saturday, April 28th. The night will be opened by local favorites Circus Mind.For those who are unfamiliar, Organ Freeman is one of the most talented young bands in the contemporary funk and jazz scene. Based in Los Angeles, Organ Freeman has been making a name for themselves over the past few years with their slick and impressive live performances. Their tight instrumental sound is created by just three people–Trevor Steer on organ and keyboards, Erik Carlson on guitar, and Rob Humphreys on drums–all of whom are fantastic players in their own right, and, when together on stage, they compliment each other brilliantly to create something groovy and exciting. It should come as no surprise that the band has spent extensive time cutting their teeth on the road with two of the best bands in live music: Umphrey’s McGee and Turkuaz.Turkuaz & Motet Members To Pay Tribute To Musicians We Lost In 2017 During Jazz FestOrgan Freeman has played in New York City several times before, supporting The Main Squeeze, Twiddle, and Pigeons Playing Ping Pong, and for an appearance at the 2016 edition of Brooklyn Comes Alive, but this show at Knitting Factory will mark their first-ever headlining performance in NYC. The Turkuaz Horns should help elevate this show to another level, matching the special vibe of the occasion.[Video: Organ Freeman]Circus Mind is a funky rock band that hails from Long Island. They have been playing together for over twenty years, focusing on the funky sounds of the 1970s, and will undoubtedly provide the perfect vibe as they open the night up for Organ Freeman.[Video: Circus Mind]Tickets for this show are on sale NOW at this link. See below for full information on this show, including art designed by Accepted Perspective–Poster Art by Jimmy RectorDate: Saturday, April 28th, 2018Artist: Live For Live Music Presents: Organ Freeman & The Turkuaz Horns w/ Special Guests Circus MindVenue: Knitting Factory – 361 Metropolitan Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11211Times: Doors – 7:00 PM / Show – 8:00 PMTickets: $12 Advance / $15 Day of show – [Buy Tickets]last_img read more

Help with kids. And pets. And …

first_imgWhen Tessa Lowinske Desmond’s husband was offered a tenure-track position at Harvard in 2010, the opportunity proved too enticing for the academic couple to resist. But the Desmonds’ dream job was also every new parent’s nightmare: a distant relocation to a city where they knew virtually no one.“We moved from Wisconsin, with newborn in arms, excited to be at Harvard but nervous to not have any resources,” Desmond said, referring to child-care help for her son, Sterling, now almost 3. Last year, the Desmonds turned to a resource that has been gaining ground among Harvard parents: the WATCH Portal, an online child-care hub that helps connect faculty, staff, and graduate student parents with student sitters.“It was just a huge blessing for us,” said Desmond, the program administrator for ethnic studies in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences (FAS).Heartened by early success stories like Desmond’s, the Office of Work/Life and the Office of Faculty Development and Diversity (FD&D), which jointly developed the WATCH Portal last year, are expanding the site’s features.The WATCH Portal (Web Access to Care at Harvard Portal) grew last month to allow postings for a variety of odd jobs. Anyone with a Harvard PIN can now post and view listings seeking Harvard students (or the teenage children of Harvard employees) to help with yard work, dog walking, house sitting, and other chores.“It’s not just parents who are juggling multiple tasks, and Harvard gets that,” said Nancy Costikyan, director of the Office of Work/Life. “This expansion is one more way that Harvard can support the very busy lives of all our faculty and staff.”The update was in part spurred by direct requests from faculty, said Judith Singer, senior vice provost for FD&D and Harvard’s James Bryant Conant Professor of Education. Already, posts have sprung up on the site seeking everything from a housekeeper to a personal chef willing to cook vegetarian meals.“Some people with older children said they no longer needed child care, but would welcome tutoring for their teenagers,” Singer said. “Others without children said they’d love to get a student to help with odd jobs, from dog sitting to stacking wood.”In its first year, the WATCH Portal garnered 1,566 users; two-thirds were parents, the rest were job-seeking students. And visitors were making real connections: Nearly 700 emails have been sent between baby sitters and parents using the site.When her former baby sitter became unavailable, Mylène Priam, an associate professor of Romance languages and literatures in FAS, said she immediately thought of the WATCH Portal.Priam had used Craigslist to look for a nanny before the portal launched; she liked that WATCH was vetted and easy to use. That access is free, compared with other online services she’d seen that charge a fee for entry to a database of vetted sitters, was another draw.“I’m grateful it was there when I was in a conundrum,” said Priam, who routinely uses a baby sitter for her 6-year-old daughter on nights and weekends. “It was great to know there was something like that already out there, that I didn’t have to wrack my brain.”Then there are Harvard parents like Desmond and her husband, Matthew, an assistant professor of sociology and a junior fellow in the Harvard Society of Fellows, whose jobs entail after-hours commitments that are essential to their developing careers. He had faculty dinners; she had evening events with students and visiting scholars to manage.Having easy access to baby sitters who lived on campus was crucial, Desmond said. Harvard students often meet her at her office, pick up her son, Sterling, and spend a few hours at the Cambridge Public Library or playing in the Center for Government and International Studies (CGIS) lounge; they’ve even taken Sterling to their Houses.“He was meeting other students and going to the dining hall, which he thought was great,” Desmond said. “I’m going to tell him he was running the halls of Harvard when he was 2 years old.”Desmond said she may use the site for dog sitting or house sitting, now that those options are available.“Having access to the WATCH Portal made our work and our life so much easier,” she said. “It made everything more seamless, and it made it possible for me to be fully present at my job.”last_img read more

Vermont gets $1.47 million in federal grants to help crime victims

first_imgPatrick Leahy (D-VT) announced Tuesday that Vermont has been awarded more than $1.47 million in federal grants to help victims of crime.  The grants come from the Crime Victims Fund, the primary source of federal financial aid for crime victims, and are administered through the US Department of Justice.“The need for victim assistance and compensation has grown over the years, and the Crime Victims Fund has been a mainstay for crime victims in states like Vermont,” said Leahy.  “Programs like those supported by the Vermont Center for Crime Victim Services help survivors piece their lives back together.  The vital funding Vermont has received from the Crime Victims Fund will help to ensure continued support for these efforts.”Vermont has received $1.27 million for victim assistance programs to support local efforts such as crisis intervention, emergency shelters, transportation, counseling and criminal justice system advocacy.  The state has also received $200,000 for compensation programs to reimburse victims and their families directly for expenses related to their victimization, including medical and mental health costs, and funeral burial expenses.  The funding is administered by the Vermont Center for Crime Victim Services.Leahy, a former prosecutor in Vermont, has led the effort in Congress to protect the Crime Victims Fund, which the last administration sought to tap for other uses.  The Fund is supported exclusively by fines and other penalties paid by convicted federal offenders, not by taxpayer dollars.  The Fund serves roughly four million crime victims every year, including victims of domestic violence, sexual assault, child abuse, elder abuse and drunk driving, as well as survivors of homicide victims.  Crime Victim Fund grants have become especially important for states at a time when many programs have faced funding cuts in the wake of the economic downturn.Leahy is the author of the Crime Victims Fund Preservation Act, which will help ensure that crime victims receive essential services and federal support under the Victims of Crime Act (VOCA).  Last October, the legislation was approved by the Senate Judiciary Committee, which Leahy chairs.  He also worked to include $100 million for crime victim assistance in the 2009 economic recovery act.More than 4,000 agencies nationwide are supported by VOCA funds each year. Source: Leahy. 9.14.2010last_img read more

Brisbane auctions draw mixed results

first_imgThe renovation at 21 Juster St, Annerley was beautiful.The home sits on a 607 square metre block and it’s leafy surround make it perfect for a family buyer.Marketing agent with Place Coorparoo, Jamal Naouri, said the suburb is drawing plenty of interest.“Annerley is a hub for busy working young families and we’re finding demand is high with many moving to the local area,” he said.“They’re wanting homes that are fully renovated as they don’t have time to do it themselves.”A crowd of 50 onlookers watched three bidders take the price from a $720,000 kick-off to eventually reach $1.05 million where it was declared, “Sold!”The buyer, Logan Drain, said couldn’t have been happier with the result. The Nundah site was bought by developers.IT WAS a cool and overcast Saturday in Brisbane but that didn’t stop auction spotters from rocking up to events.The morning kicked off at 43 Marvin St, Holland Park where a modest but well positioned three-bedroom, one-bathroom cottage on 749 square metres of land was on offer. 39 Sunny Ave, Wavell Heights had the agent and auctioneer running a marathon to secure a sale — but it was worth it in the end.The striking three-level, six-bedroom, four-bathroom home has a cracking southerly aspect taking in the lights of the CBD and views through to the Bunya Mountains.An opening bid of $1.3 million received no counter.This saw a flurry of activity as marketing agent from Southerby’s International Realty Ascot, Joseph Lordi, ran a marathon between the buyers and seller.Most of the 85-strong crowd waited around to see the offer raised to $1.61 million, and the property was declared “on the market.”With no other bids forthcoming, the buyers could celebrate their new digs.Nearby, developers were keen on the prospects for 79 Bage St, Nundah.More from newsMould, age, not enough to stop 17 bidders fighting for this home6 hours agoBuyers ‘crazy’ not to take govt freebies, says 28-yr-old investor6 hours agoThe developer buyer of 79 Bage St, Nundah, is taking some time to consider his options.There were 23 registered bidders battling it out for the 1630 square metre site and its two-bedroom colonial home.The holding is a grouping of four separate titles and it’s flexible potential created hot competition according to marketing agent at Ray White Ascot, Damon Warat.“They are not making any more land and if you could find a bigger block of land with city views this close to the CBD then you should buy it,” he said.Come the fall of the hammer the property achieved $2.55 million — selling to a local developer who will land bank the holding while planning a project.A classic circa 1920s character home at 21 Juster St, Annerley that’s undergone an extensive renovation has seen the seller’s hard work pay off with a big auction result. 43 Marvin St, Holland Park West failed to sell but there’s still plenty of post-auction interest according to the agent.Selling agent with Place Bulimba, Shane Hicks, said interest had been good for the home which has a backstory.“The house itself was moved here in 1929,” he said.“It was moved from Kangaroo Point to make way for the story bridge, so it’s got a bit of a history to it.”Holland Park West is one of those go ahead suburbs — well established, wide leafy streets and plenty of character to appeal to a broad buyer demographic, said Mr Hicks.“We’ve had first homebuyers … we’ve had investor looking at it for the long-term growth of the land and we’ve has some developers who’d like to knock the house down — the house hasn’t always lived here … so you can actually take it down and end up with a magnificent block of land.”Unfortunately among the solid turnout of around 40 onlookers, there were no registered bidders and the event was over soon after it began.Mr Hicks said despite the outcome, there were buyers keen to put the property under conditional contract and he expects a sale will soon be finalised.One of the day’s property jewels was the event held at 39 Sunny Ave, Wavell Heights. Logan Drain and his family are “stoked” to be the new owners of 21 Juster St, Annerley. Photo supplied.“It’s the right size for us and we’re stoked,” Mr Drain said.“They’ve done a great job on the renovation.” 64 Robe St, Grange made its mark today too with auctioneer Haesley Cush very pleased to achieve a $935,000 result for the two-bedroom renovator on 617 square metres.“It was a cracking auction with agent Kim Ridings at Ray White Alderley registering four registered bidders in front of a big crowd,” Mr Cush said.“The opening bid came in light and low at $600,000 but the property was called on the market at $901,000 and sold for $935,000.”Mr Cush wasn’t resting on his laurels though. Two hours later he fronted up at 120 Harcourt St, New Farm where he secured $1.175 million for the modest but superbly located five-bedroom home on 498 square metres.last_img read more

Tacoma Welcomes US West Coast’s Largest Container Cranes

first_imgImage Courtesy: NWSAA giant ship carrying four of the West Coast’s largest container cranes has arrived in the Port of Tacoma.The ship, Zhen Hua 28, will sit at anchor in Commencement Bay for a couple of days before heading to Husky Terminal at the northwest end of the Blair Waterway.The Northwest Seaport Alliance (NWSA) ordered eight new super-post-Panamax cranes from Shanghai Zhenhua Heavy Industries (ZPMC) in China. The remaining four cranes are scheduled to arrive in 2019.The cranes will be installed at Husky Terminal, which is undergoing USD 250 million terminal improvements that began in September 2016.Upgrades include strengthening and realigning a berth and adding eight new super-post-Panamax cranes capable of serving two 18,000-TEU containerships at the same time.The new cranes will have an outreach of 24 containers and a lift height of 165 feet above the pier deck.last_img read more

Ingebrigtsen siblings’ track success driven by ‘dictator’ father’s tough love

first_imgOne of the boys….Filip Ingebrigtsen. PHOTO IAAF ORGDoha, Qatar | AFP | Gjert Ingebrigtsen admits he is a dictator but one who produces results as three of his sons — Jakob, Henrik and Filip — will contest Monday’s 5,000 metres final at the World Athletics Championships.The youngest of the Norwegian family trio, 19-year-old Jakob — who achieved a remarkable 1500m/5,000m double at the European Championships last year — earned a reprieve to join them in the final after winning an appeal against disqualification following his heat in Doha on Friday.Their story is not unique in terms of three brothers succeeding in athletics — the Borlee siblings (Dylan, Jonathan and Kevin), also coached by their father, won European gold last year in the Belgian 4x400m relay team.But the Ingebritsens’ story stands out given that their father had no athletics background whatsoever.The 53-year-old Gjert’s skills appeared to lie elsewhere as he acts as accountant for his wife Tone’s hair salon business and his day job is working for a logistics company.He revels in having been termed a dictator by Filip — who was European 1500m champion in 2016 following in the footsteps of 28-year-old Henrik, who won the title in 2012 — in a reality television series that Gjert agreed to despite the reservations of his sons.In the TV series, Filip objected to his father forcing the 26-year-old to cancel a holiday wth his then girlfriend.– ‘You have to be a dictator’ –Filip’s subsequent move to Oslo with his now wife last year from the family home city of Sandnes was not appreciated by Gjert.“I don’t know anybody from Oslo being good at anything,” Gjert dismissively told the Daily Telegraph. “In sport, a dictatorship is much better than the opposite.“You have a small time of year to be at your best and you cannot have democratic decisions for everything.“You have to be a dictator. You have to take decisions in a short time and have to believe that what you are doing is the best for the boys.”Gjert, who is also the boys’ agent and manager, may have produced results on the track but they are not necessarily approved of by the Norwegian populace as a whole.“They don’t really like the professional mentality in Norway,” Filip told the Daily Telegraph.“They want to be like they are just out for recreational training and suddenly you’re the best. “That’s not how things work. You need to be focused over time. You need to have a different mentality. You can’t be like the rest.”The boys — three of seven children ranging in age from 31 to five — have been ultra-competitive from the early days, even down to which of them would get in or out of the family car first.Super excited to reach my first final in a global championship!! Can’t believe that 3x Ingebrigtsen is ready to race on monday, LET’S GO! 🥰 #Final #Doha2019 #TeamIngebrigtsen @ Khalifa International… https://t.co/AEqTZgji81— Jakob Ingebrigtsen (@JakobIng) September 28, 2019– ‘To endure me’ –Gjert told the BBC there was no special switch that was suddenly turned on — they were just a normal Norwegian family enjoying outdoor pursuits and he is not “especially interested in sport.”“It might be that I am rather strict in the way I see things,” he said.“The boys come to me and say: ‘I want to be a European champion.’“I say: ‘I want to help you, I can help you, but you have to do everything that I tell you.’“I stand out from other parents. I am very demanding and it is a kind of contract between me and the boys to help them be the best they can be — but they have to endure me following them every day all year.”Filip, who will along with Jakob double up in the 1500m, does despite his “dictator” remark appreciate the end results.“He will always be my father,” he told the BBC. “You can’t take that hat off and say now I am your coach.Share on: WhatsApplast_img read more

Caring for Animals in Monmouth County and Beyond

first_imgLicitrasaid that “very few towns” don’t have feral cats, though it can be less noticeablein bigger municipalities. Within the last three years, he has been able tobring 15 municipalities on board to share the costs and benefits of the TNRprogram with the MCSPCA. EATONTOWN – This year, the Monmouth County Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (MCSPCA) on Wall Street will celebrate its 75th anniversary. ThatMonmouth County humane law enforcement agency had such great success that in2017 the state Legislature asked him to testify about why his model was succeedingat the MCSPCA, while other county SPCAs in the state were not. The answer? “Over theyears, the New Jersey State Legislature has spent thousands, tens of thousandsof hours writing animal cruelty law. And you left it statutorily responsible toa volunteer police department to enforce. How is that possible?” he recalledasking the state lawmakers. “You have professional career law enforcement doingthis job as opposed to the volunteers – who mean well – but 99 percent of themhave no law enforcement background,” he said. Licitra said it is important that the kittens and cats at the adoption center stay in a relaxed environment. Photo by Allison Perrine Rescuing Dogs from Korea and China Accordingto John Klein, they are “trying to change the world one dog at a time.” Housepets aren’t the only animals that require care. When in need, squirrels, deer,raccoons and more are brought to the shelter by animal control officers. Theanimals are then released back to the wild or to a wildlife rehabilitationcenter within 24 to 48 hours. Ross Licitra, director of the Monmouth County SPCA. Photo by Allison Perrine The spacewould be for wildlife rehabilitation and public use, like education programsfor children. You have to educate children when they’re young enough to understandthat wildlife is just as important as pets, Licitra said. Setting the Standard Thatbackground helped him mold the MCSPCA and its humane law enforcement agencyinto what it is today. He makes sure the MCSPCA’s agency works closely with theMonmouth County Prosecutor’s Office and that its humane law enforcement agencyis comprised of paid personnel, not volunteers, to guarantee calls areanswered. In other counties with volunteer agencies, some calls go unansweredwhen volunteers are unavailable. He made this possible with the help of SheriffShaun Golden, Arnone and the county prosecutor. With the help of No Dogs Left Behind, a global animal rescue organization, and local volunteers John and Robin Klein, the MCSPCA has taken two trips to China to rescue dogs from the Yulin Dog Meat Festival. The festival is held annually during the summer solstice and runs for about 10 days. According to No Dogs Left Behind, about 10,000 to 15,000 dogs are killed and consumed each festival, held in Yulin, Guangxi, China. Dogs are often stolen from their owners, packed onto trucks and sent to their death. Afterbeing rescued, the dogs are brought to the MCSPCA center in Eatontown. They aretaken care of, evaluated and eventually put up for adoption to a loving home. Theorganization exists to protect and advocate for domestic pets, wildlife anddomestic livestock within Monmouth County. Lately, its mission has expanded.With its partners in animal welfare, the MCSPCA wants to step in to save animalsfrom high-kill shelters throughout the southern United States and Puerto Ricoand from the meat trade in Korea and China, and lend a hand in rescue effortsduring natural disasters. Afterthat, the state Legislature disbanded the NJSPCA’s volunteer humane lawenforcement division and mandated that every county prosecutor’s office have anSPCA law enforcement division, like at the MCSPCA, Licitra said. With that,chief humane law enforcement officers – like Licitra – had to be appointed ineach county SPCA, and each municipal police department had to appoint a humanelaw enforcement officer. Additionally, all humane officers appointed had to goback to the police academy for training. The dogs were quarantined, all canine and feline adoptions were halted and veterinary services stopped. “The decision to close the shelter for adoptions and our Vogel Veterinary Care Center during one of the busiest times of the year for us was difficult, but done out of pure concern for not only the health and well-being of all our dogs, but of genuine concern for all dogs in the Monmouth County area and beyond,” said Licitra in a statement posted on the MCSPCA website Dec. 20. Beforeassuming his role as the executive director of the MCSPCA and the chief humaneofficer for the county, Licitra was a police officer. He worked locally forfive years and later joined the Monmouth County Prosecutor’s Office in 1986where he handled narcotics, gang and homicide cases. He was an officer for 30years. TheMCSPCA operates on a 30 percent profit margin. The revenue it earns helps payfor medical services at the shelter, which runs about $800,000 annually. “Thebiggest challenge for us is always funding and space,” he said. The shelter’sclosure at the holidays is expected to have a negative effect on its balancesheet. Trap, Neuter and Release, or TNR, is a program designed to control the feral cat population or, as Licitra calls them, “community cats.” Animal control personnel visit municipalities that participate in the MCSCPA’s TNR program and bring stray cats to the shelter, neuter or spay them, give them shots and clip their ear tips – which does not hurt them, he said. Then they release the stray cats back where they came from. If they are kittens, the MCSPCA keeps them and adopts them out. If they are house cats that have been abandoned, they also adopt them out. “Theytorture the dogs as much as they can and then kill them. They say it makes themeat taste better when they’re tortured,” said Licitra. Theclosest wildlife rehabilitation center is in Mercer County, but Licitra saidhe’s working on bringing one to Monmouth County with the help of Freeholder TomArnone. “The county has so many great parks and in one of the parks we’d find abuilding and we’d pay to have it all renovated,” he said. “Long Branch has been our most successful,” said Licitra. He estimated they have helped over 500 cats in Long Branch alone. It’s importantto note, however, that the MCSPCA is not funded by the county. “We are anagency created by state law and authority, but we’re self-funded,” saidLicitra. Theshelter takes in animals from New Jersey and high-kill shelters in southernstates and Puerto Rico. But recently, it turned its efforts overseas to rescueanimals in China and Korea from being tortured and killed for human consumption. Community Cats Theshelter recently rescued nine dogs from China that would have otherwise beensent to the festival. They also rescued an additional nine at the beginning of2019. In 2018, the shelter partnered with the Humane Society for the UnitedStates (HSUS) and rescued dogs from Korea that were slated for humanconsumption. The Wildlife Room TheMCSPCA works closely with the New Jersey Division of Fish and Wildlife. Ithandles regulatory incidents involving fishing, hunting and more. When animalcruelty or inhumane activity is involved, the MCSPCA steps in. In 2020,the MCSPCA will officially be the “first ever” to receive state budgetaryfunding – $25,000 – for the TNR program, thanks to state Sen. Vin Gopal, saidLicitra. He also credited Arnone as being a big supporter of the MCSCPA’s TNRprogram. This article originally appeared in the Jan. 2-9, 2020 print edition of The Two River Times. He went on to say the affected dogs were improving and he thanked the public for their “incredible amount of support.” The center reopened on Jan. 2, 2020. Theshelter ended 2019 on a sad note after it had to close for several weeks duringits busiest time of year to treat dogs with H3N2 influenza, or canine flu, anextremely contagious disease that likely arrived with a rescue transport,according to Ross Licitra, executive director of the MCSPCA. last_img read more