‘He’s Championship class!’ – QPR fans react to loanee’s man-of-the-match display

first_imgQPR fans on Twitter were impressed by out-on-loan midfielder Michael Doughty’s man-of-the-match performance for Swindon on Saturday.Doughty scored a penalty and also set up the Robins’ second goal in a televised 2-2 draw at Peterborough.And those Rangers supporters who saw the game were unsurprised by a stat underlining Doughty’s influence at Swindon this season – with some feeling he should still be at Loftus Road.Michael Doughty has had a hand in all five of Swindon’s league goals this season (2 goals, 3 assists). #Swindon #QPR— Jack Supple (@Jack_Supple) September 3, 2016How Michael Doughty can’t get a look in for Wales is beyond me. He’s Championship class in L1. Had a hand in every #STFC goal…— Ashley Allen (@QPRFC_Ash) September 3, 2016Not quite sure what happens between Swindon & Shepherds Bush but even allowing for 1 Div lower Doughty’s performances deserve analysis. #QPR— Barry Byrne (@ByrneBarry) September 3, 2016Jeez I see Doughty is tearing up league 1 again, it’s a shame he hasn’t done it in a QPR shirt yet— Conor (@conorbarz88) September 3, 2016Yes Michael Doughty!— Soph (@sophqpr) September 3, 2016We better not loan out Doughty again next season— Polter (@PerfectPolter) September 3, 2016Swindon fans who have been watching him all season were also full of praise…Doughty has yet again proven why he is the best in that team, simply untouchable— Joshua Peters (@joshuapeterss) September 3, 2016Doughty made it look easy today— Aidan (@aidan_stfc) September 3, 2016Doughty involved in every Town goal this season. What a player. #STFC— Dan Johnson ن (@danwjonson) September 3, 2016See also:QPR’s Doughty returns to Swindon on loanIns and outs: every summer deal done by Chelsea, Brentford, Fulham and QPRFollow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

SA star athlete heads to Beijing

first_imgKhanyi Magubane South Africa’s star athlete Khotso Mokoena has done it again. Standing at almost two metres, Mokoena has qualified to compete in the long jump at the Beijing Olympics. He launched a phenomenal leap of 8,24m with his first effort at the South African Track and Field Championships on 14 March in Stellenbosch, Western Cape.This will be his second participation at the Olympic games. In 2004, when he was only 19, he came fourteenth in the triple jump contest in Greece.Earlier in March this year, Mokoena produced a gold medal-winning performance at the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF) World Indoor Championships in Valencia, Spain. The 22-year-old athlete was competing against Britain’s Christopher Tomlinson in a tight final on 8 March.Tomlinson initially led the competition with his 8.06m jump, while Mokoena opened with 8.05m. The two men were neck-and-neck until Mokoena became the clear winner with his final leap of 8.08m. The British jumper claimed the silver medal, while Mohamed Salman Al Khuwalidi of Saudi Arabia picked up the bronze.Another South African athlete who excelled at the IAAF games was 800m star Mbulaeni Mulaudzi, who, despite being the national record holder, had to settle for a silver medal in the race. Sudanese athlete Abubaker Kaki Khamis won the coveted gold medal.Since the start of its participation at the World Indoor championships in the 1990s, South Africa has won eight medals. Mulaudzi has claimed three of those medals in the 800m. Apart from his silver this year and his gold medal win 2004, he also won silver in 2006. Johan Botha was a gold medal winner in the 800 metres in 1999 and won silver in 2001. Okkert Brits took a bronze in the pole vault in 1995 and sprinter Shaun Bownes walked away with a bronze medal in the 60m hurdles in 2001.Who is Khotso Mokoena?Khotso Mokoena is a rising star in South African athletics. He might only be 22 years old, but he already has a long list of awards to his name. In 2004, the same year he first competed in the Olympic Games, Mokoena won a gold medal at the World Junior Championships for his triple jump of 16.77m.By the time he was 20, Mokoena was the holder of all South African records in the long jump and triple jump. He has entered just about all the major athletic contests around the world, where he has hardly returned home without a medal. In 2006, he won a silver medal for South Africa at the Commonwealth Games in Sydney, Australia for his triple jump.Useful linksAthletics SASuper sport ZoneIAAFNational Olympics Committee of South AfricaDo you have any queries or comments on this article? Email Khanyi Magubane at [email protected]last_img read more

Exhibition traces migrant workers’ journey

first_imgSouth Africa was built on mining, and its mines were built on migrant workers. Millions of black men across southern Africa were forced by economic circumstance and taxes to travel to the city of gold, leaving their families at home. (Images: WAM) • Fiona Rankin-Smith Curator Ngezinyawo – Migrant Journeys Wits Art Museum +27 11 717 1365 [email protected] • Benin gallery keeps African art in Africa • Exhibition exposes apartheid, celebrates South African photography • Soweto: from struggle to suburbia • Historic Soweto township turns 80 • Africanis – the dog of AfricaMelissa Jane CookAs the country emerges from a volatile five-month long strike in the platinum mining sector, the Wits Art Museum (WAM) opens an extraordinary exhibition focusing on migrant workers in South Africa. Migrant labour is fundamental to the making of modern South Africa and the exhibition tells the stories of these men.Ngezinyawo – Migrant Journeys is rich and diverse, and spans many years of collective heritage. Items on display include contemporary artwork, archival documents, photographs, films, music, artefacts from ethnographic collections, and interviews. It glaringly highlights that 20 years into democracy, there are still numerous, unresolved problems associated with the system of migrant labour.The elaborate art, dress, dance, music and song that migrants crafted to assert and express their humanity feature prominently. Life was and continues to be difficult for migrant workers. Performance and song played a vital role in passing on oral histories, for social commentary and artistic expression. These creative outputs show an ability to survive with dignity despite the daily hardships they faced.Like the migrants, visitors to the exhibition participate in a physical journey through the museum. They walk the road alongside early migrants to the cities, who mainly sought work on the mines. Overcoming hostility, harsh living conditions, violence, dispossession and loss are the recurrent themes at the exhibition – yet there are also themes of resilience and creativity.The glitter of goldSouth African society changed greatly when gold was discovered on the Witwatersrand in 1886. This discovery was central to South Africa’s industrial development and to the politics of segregation. Here, on the goldfields of the Rand, the lives of many people intersected. Within a decade, Johannesburg had developed into the largest city in South Africa, populated by tens of thousands. Prospectors, labourers, fortune hunters, shop keepers and immigrants from all over the world flocked to the city. Residential areas were hastily constructed and in the poorer sections slums developed.As the mines went deeper underground, the demand for cheap labour intensified. The Chamber of Mines asked the government to provide a cheap labour supply. Over time, the state introduced a number of measures to force more black men to work in the mines. These included introducing taxes such as the hut tax and the poll tax – they had to leave their land to work in the city to earn money to pay the taxes.For its part, the Chamber of Mines preferred to use migrant labour because they could be paid very low wages. The industry justified the low wages by claiming that the migrants’ families earned an additional income in the reserves. Because migrants were supposedly only part-time workers, the mine owners did not have to provide them with any kind of social security. Mine owners also preferred migrant labour because the workers could be controlled more easily. The men had to sign employment contracts. If they broke their contracts by deserting, which many did, they were arrested and got a criminal record. The migrants were also housed in closed compounds, or hostels, which were tightly controlled.Conditions on the mines were very bad in the early decades. Workers often laboured 14 hours a day. Deaths from major accidents, pneumonia, tuberculosis, silicosis and malnutrition were extremely high.Tracing the journeyTracing the journey from rural areas to the city, the interactive exhibition includes personal objects such as hut tax receipts and a stamped passbook. There are envelopes decorated by self-taught artist Tito Zungu. Using pencil, ballpoint pens and coloured pens, the envelopes were decorated with images of boats, aeroplanes and transistor radios. Moving between time and space, these envelopes made the journey from work to home, linking the migrants’ different worlds. They spent long periods of time away from their families and letter writing was the only means of communication.Personal objects such as walking sticks, snuff bags and pipes that the workers carried with them were powerful reminders of the homes and families they left behind. These objects can be thought of as symbols of the personal journey that they made.Single-sex compounds with concrete bunk beds and cold, bare walls were constructed to house migrant mine workers. Some of these mining compounds, or hostels, are still in use today, although the city of Johannesburg is renovating them and turning them into family units. Photographs and other remarkable objects on display provide insight into the living conditions and hardships encountered in hostels. But there are also extraordinarily creative everyday objects, music and performances that transcended the daily struggle. There are envelopes decorated by self-taught artist Tito Zungu. Using pencil, ballpoint pens and coloured pens, the envelopes were decorated with images of boats, aeroplanes and transistor radios. Kentridge filmA short film by artist William Kentridge is part of Ngezinyawo – Migrant Journeys. It is a dramatization of the inequality and oppression of life on the mines. Set in the over-exploited, scorched industrial and mining landscape around Johannesburg, it represents the legacy of a time of abuse and injustice.Kentridge develops the analogy between the landscape and the mind. A journey into the mines provides a visual representation of a journey into the conscience of the main character, Soho Eckstein, the white South African property owner who exploits the resources of land and black human labour which are under his domain. Throughout the film the imagery shifts between the geological landscape underground inhabited by innumerable black miners and Soho’s world of white luxury above ground. Soho sits at his desk in his customary pin-stripe suit and punches adding machines and cash registers, creating a flow of gold bars, exhausted miners, blasted landscapes and blocks of uniform housing. Soho sits at his desk in his customary pin-stripe suit and punches adding machines and cash registers, creating a flow of gold bars, exhausted miners, blasted landscapes and blocks of uniform housing.The issues surrounding migrants that are addressed in this exhibition are part of a history that continues to profoundly affect South African society. The difficult lives of migrant workers and their families, xenophobic violence and recent upheavals in the mining sector – culminating in the Marikana massacre and this year’s devastating strike in the platinum sector – are just a few of the headlines that confront contemporary South Africa.A book entitled A Long Way Home: Migrant Worker Worlds 1800 – 2014 has been published to accompany the exhibition and includes essays by leading local and international academics.Guardian of the exhibitionThe exhibition was curated by Fiona Rankin-Smith, veteran WAM curator and the force behind important exhibitions such as Figuring Faith: Images of Belief in Africa (2005) and Halakasha, the football exhibition mounted to coincide with the 2010 World Cup.For Ngezinyawo – Migrant Journeys, she collaborated with Peter Delius, the history professor and widely published author from Wits University. “South Africa is internationally infamous as the site of a systematic and pervasive system of racial discrimination. What is less well known, though, is how uniquely fundamental migrant labour was to the making of modern South Africa,” Delius explains.Ngezinyawo – Migrant Journeys is on display at the Wits Art Museum until 20 July 2014.last_img read more

Pork elections July 20

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The election of pork producer delegate candidates for the 2018 National Pork Producers (Pork Act) Delegate Body will take place at noon on Thursday, July 20th, 2017 in conjunction with a Board of Directors meeting of Ohio Pork Council at the Cincinnati Radisson, 668 W. 5th Street, Covington, Kentucky.All Ohio pork producers are invited to attend. Any producer, age 18 or older, who is a resident of the state and has paid all assessments due may be considered as a delegate candidate and/or participate in the election. All eligible producers are encouraged to bring with them a sales receipt proving that hogs were sold in their name and the checkoff deducted.last_img read more

Strong April for U.S. red meat exports, including new volume record for pork

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest April exports of U.S. pork, beef and lamb were sharply higher than a year ago in both volume and value, according to data released by USDA and compiled by the U.S. Meat Export Federation (USMEF). Pork exports set a new volume record, fueled by tremendous demand in Mexico, while beef exports posted the best-ever results for the month of April.April pork export volume was 230,049 metric tons (mt), up 13% from a year ago and topping the previous high set in November 2016. April export value was $584.1 million, also up 13%. For January through April, pork export volume was 4% ahead of last year’s record pace at 866,346 mt, while value increased 9% to $2.29 billion. (For pork muscle cuts, excluding variety meat, April was also a record volume month at 184,487 mt, up 18% from a year ago. Muscle cut export value was $480.6 million, up 14%.)Exports accounted for nearly 30% of total pork production in April, up from 28.4% a year ago, while the percentage of muscle cuts exported also increased significantly (25.8%, up from 23.5%). Through April, the percentage of total production exported was fairly steady with last year at 27.4%, while muscle cuts jumped from 22.8% to 23.5%.April pork export value averaged $58.45 per head slaughtered, up 6% from a year ago, while the January-April average increased 5% to $55.69.Beef export volume was 111,213 mt in April, up 11% year-over-year. Export value was $676.7 million, up 23% and the fourth-highest on record. Through the first four months of 2018, exports were up 10% in volume to 429,286 mt. Export value was $2.59 billion, 20% above last year’s record pace.Exports accounted for 14.1% of total beef production in April, up from 13.6% a year ago. For muscle cuts only, the percentage exported was 11.3%, up from 10.6%. For January through April, exports accounted for 13.4% of total production and 10.8% for muscle cuts, each up about half a percentage point from last year.Beef export value averaged $328.46 per head of fed slaughter in April, up 16% from a year ago. Through April, per-head export value averaged $318.91, up 17%.Even with growth in red meat production, both pork and beef exports have accounted for a larger share and contributed more dollars per head, indicating strong international demand.Huge month for pork to Mexico; exports to Korea continued to surgeMexico was again the pacesetter for pork exports in April, with volume reaching 79,019 mt – up 34% from a year ago and the second-largest on record. Export value to Mexico was $134.1 million, up 28%. Through the first four months of 2018, exports to Mexico were 7% above last year’s record volume pace at 282,675 mt, with value up 6% to $505.4 million.Maintaining this pace will be challenging, however, with Mexico announcing retaliatory tariffs on imports of most U.S. pork products effective June 5. The tariff rate on chilled and frozen pork muscle cuts is 10% until July 5, when it is set to increase to 20%.“The outstanding April performance for pork exports to Mexico really underscores the importance of this market to the U.S. industry and how it has been such a reliable trading partner for hams, picnics and other pork cuts,” said USMEF President and CEO Dan Halstrom. “USMEF will continue to emphasize the quality and consistency of U.S. pork to red meat customers in Mexico and make every effort to help U.S. suppliers retain their business. But make no mistake about it, the U.S. industry is going to have to fend off competitors who suddenly have a significant tariff rate advantage and see a clear opening into the Mexican market.”Pork exports to South Korea continued to build momentum in April, with volume (25,370 mt, up 74%) and value ($74.1 million, up 81%) increasing significantly from a year ago. Through April, exports to Korea are on a record pace, climbing 44% in volume to 94,888 mt, valued at $276.1 million (up 55%). Strong growth in consumer demand and duty-free access under the Korea-U.S. Free Trade Agreement (KORUS) have fueled a rapidly expanding presence for U.S. pork in Korea.While pork exports to the China/Hong Kong region were below year-ago levels in April, shipments remained relatively strong despite the additional 25% tariff on U.S. pork that took effect April 2. It is likely, however, that the trade impact will show up more dramatically in May export data and in coming months. The tariff increase essentially tripled China’s standard rate on frozen pork imports, taking it from 12% to 37% (the increase does not apply to Hong Kong, which still charges zero duty). April exports to China/Hong Kong were 41,567 mt, down 14% from a year ago, but slipped only slightly in value to $95.9 million. For January through April, exports to China/Hong Kong were 15% below last year’s pace in volume (153,248 mt) but steady in value at $356.6 million.“It is encouraging to see that pork volumes to China/Hong Kong held up fairly well in April, but the tariff disadvantage is still having a negative impact on the U.S. industry and has pressured prices for key export items,” Halstrom noted. “It’s another situation in which our competitors are capitalizing on the extra cost associated with importing U.S. pork.”For January through April, other highlights for U.S. pork include: Exports to leading value market Japan were 1% below last year’s pace in volume (132,534 mt) but increased 1% in value ($544.8 million). This included a 5% decrease in chilled pork volume (68,532 mt), valued at $330 million (down 1%).Strong growth in Colombia pushed pork exports to South America up 23% from a year ago in volume (39,520 mt) and 24% in value ($96.7 million).Led by mainstay markets Honduras and Guatemala and sharply higher shipments to Panama, exports to Central America climbed 23% from a year ago in volume (26,459 mt) and 27% in value ($63.3 million).Pork exports achieved solid growth in the Philippines and more than doubled from a year ago to Vietnam, as exports to the ASEAN region increased 20% in volume (15,435 mt) and 31% in value ($43.8 million). Asian markets and Mexico highlight strong April for beef exportsJapan maintained its position as the leading volume and value market for U.S. beef, with April exports totaling 25,650 mt (up 9% from a year ago) valued at $166.6 million (up 16%). Through April, exports to Japan were steady with last year’s volume at 98,090 mt while value increased 10% to $626.1 million. This included a 4% increase in chilled beef to 47,322 mt, valued at $375 million (up 17%). Frozen shipments have regained momentum now that the 50% safeguard duty rate has expired. But with a 38.5% rate in place for both chilled and frozen beef, the U.S. remains at a large disadvantage compared to its top competitor, Australia.U.S. beef continues to build tremendous momentum in South Korea, where April exports were up 62% from a year ago in volume (19,185 mt) and 72% in value ($134.8 million). For January through April, exports to Korea climbed 31% to 71,094 mt, valued at $501 million (up 45%). Chilled exports totaled 15,480 mt (up 29%) valued at $148 million (up 40%). In contrast to Japan, U.S. beef has a slight tariff advantage versus Australia, as KORUS was implemented earlier than the Korea-Australia Free Trade Agreement.“The enthusiasm for U.S. beef in these markets may be at the highest level I’ve ever seen,” Halstrom said. “In nearly every segment of the retail and restaurant sectors, U.S. beef is attracting new customers with a wider range of cuts and menu items. It’s an exciting trend that’s not just limited to Japan and Korea, with U.S. beef’s popularity also strengthening in other Asian markets and in the Western Hemisphere.”For January through April, other highlights for U.S. beef include: In Mexico, exports were 5% ahead of last year’s pace in volume (78,435 mt) and 16% higher in value ($342.4 million). Demand was especially strong in April, as exports totaled 21,396 mt (up 22% and the largest since August), while value increased 33% to $92.1 million.Exports to China/Hong Kong increased 23% in volume (46,043 mt) and surged 51% in value to $352.4 million. China still accounts for a small portion of these exports, as shipments to China were 2,299 mt valued at $21.3 million. China reopened to U.S. beef in June of last year. While U.S. beef is not yet subject to retaliatory duties in China, it remains on the proposed retaliation list with a possible additional tariff of 25%.Taiwan continues to display a growing appetite for U.S. beef, especially for chilled cuts. Exports to Taiwan were 30% above last year’s pace in volume (17,500 mt) and 42% higher in value ($168.7 million). Chilled exports were up 43% in volume (7,605 mt) and value ($96 million), as U.S. beef captured 74% of Taiwan’s chilled beef market.Steady growth in the Philippines and a tripling of exports to Indonesia pushed exports to the ASEAN region 35% above last year’s pace in volume (14,865 mt) and 37% higher in value ($82 million).Exports to South America were up 14% in volume (8,971 mt) and 28% in value ($43.5 million), with the main destinations being Chile, Peru and Colombia. Leading market Chile was up 20% in volume (4,137 mt) and 14% in value ($22.5 million), though shipments slowed in March and April following a strong start to the year. Solid April for lamb exports as 2018 rebound continuesApril exports of U.S. lamb were well above last year’s low totals in both volume (973 mt, up 97%) and value ($1.9 million, up 48%). Through the first four months of 2018, exports climbed 39% in volume (3,457 mt) and 16% in value ($7.3 million). Growth was driven by stronger variety meat demand in Mexico and larger muscle cut shipments to the Bahamas, the Turks and Caicos Islands and Canada. Gabon and Angola also show promise as potential growth destinations for lamb variety meat.Complete April export results for U.S. beef, pork and lamb are available from USMEF’s statistics web page.last_img read more

Government Forges Closer Collaboration With Engineers

first_img Engineers are central to the planning, design, construction and maintenance of infrastructure networks. Engineers can provide the government with advice on the research, information and funding needs. Formal linkages between engineers, scientists and other key stakeholders would promote the sharing of up-to-date information. The Government is seeking closer collaboration with the island’s engineers as it seeks to develop sound implementation strategies for climate change adaptation and mitigation.Minister of Water, Land, Environment and Climate Change, Hon. Robert Pickersgill,said engineers have a key role to play in assisting the country to adapt to climate change and the Government would welcome the technical expertise that they provide in this area.“Engineers can provide the government with advice on the research, information and funding needs that (it) requires to safeguard our infrastructure and communities that are vulnerable to the effects of climate change,” the Minister said.He was addressing the opening of the Jamaica Institution of Engineer (JIE) three-day conference at the Knutsford Court hotel in Kingston on September 24.The Minister noted that engineers are central to the planning, design, construction and maintenance of infrastructure networks which support economic activity and protect human health and welfare, and with climate change, major changes to the layout and use of these networks will therefore be required.“This will ensure sufficient resilience to cope with foreseeable climate change impacts including an evaluation of the physical vulnerability of civil infrastructure such as road networks, water and sewerage systems and the energy grid,” he said.The Minister further noted that the creation of formal linkages between engineers, scientists and other key stakeholders which would promote the sharing of up-to-date information on best adaptive practices and regional climate datasets, could also provide input to government for setting research, legislative and expenditure priorities to support its climate change efforts.“Regular and meaningful consultation between the engineering profession and the government on climate change policy is also required and I firmly believe that opportunities must be provided for professional engineers to acquire and upgrade their skills regarding new techniques and practices required to adapt to climate change,” he said.Minister Pickersgill further challenged engineers to seize the opportunities climate change presents to develop new, innovative infrastructure systems and services.“Adaptation to climate change provides opportunities in the new green economy. New opportunities in engineering design and manufacturing will come from the development of low carbon renewable energy technologies including hydro, wind and solar; as will the building of resilience into existing infrastructure and designing new systems that are robust and efficient,” he said.Themed: ‘Engineers Embracing Change’, the event was held as part of activities to mark Engineers’ Week which is being observed from September 22 to 29. Topics being discussed during the conference include the national building code; energy utilisation technology; climate change adaptation; construction and innovative design; manufacturing and industrial engineering; and risk management and disaster reduction. Story Highlightslast_img read more

Goodbye Dead Puck Era

It could be that the ongoing analytics boom in hockey has affected a change in the old “get the puck to the net however possible” evangelism that once was pre-eminent. It’s true that the puck won’t go into the net unless it’s guided toward the net, but not all shots are created equal: An unimpeded shot from between the dots has a much better chance of hitting the twine than a shot taken from the blue line and directed toward a bunch of traffic in front of the net, for example. If expected goals are any indication, players are taking smarter shots — not more shots — than they did in the past, and that’s leading to more goals.We might expect that slumping goaltending could also provide part of the answer. The average save percentage (.908) across the NHL is the lowest it’s been in a decade. But if we isolate goaltenders who were roughly in their prime (between the ages 25 and 31) in both 2015-16 and 2018-19 — presumably a group whose inherent skills haven’t changed very much even as the NHL’s goals-per-game average has — their average save percentage has dipped by an astounding 12 points over that span.By comparison, the overall league average in save percentage is down by only 7 points, which indicates that goaltenders who were not in the goalie population in 2015-16 are having a better time adjusting to the league than goalies who were already around — even ones still in their primes. It’s fair to conclude, then, that goaltending has gotten demonstrably more difficult in a short period of time, and veteran goalies appear to have had a hard time adapting to shooters who have figured out how to take smarter and more dangerous shots.This is all in sharp contrast to the amount of scoring that occurred in the past decade-plus. In the past, changes to the NHL rulebook have had a bubble effect: Scoring increases immediately but regresses within a season or two. That was certainly the case in 2005-06, which was defined by a spate of rule changes and a cadre of whistle-happy referees. That season, the size of goaltender equipment was reduced; the two-line offsides rule was abolished; the neutral zone was reduced by 4 feet, expanding the space each team had to mount an offensive zone attack; and goaltenders were no longer allowed to play the puck anywhere they wanted behind the goal line, instead restricted to a trapezoid behind their own net. Power-play opportunities skyrocketed to 5.85 per team per game, up by 1.61 from 2003-04.This all meant that scoring jumped from 5.14 goals per game in 2003-04 to 6.16 goals per game in 2005-06. The boost was short-lived, however. Scoring dipped beneath 6 goals per game the following season, and as the decade post-lockout progressed, scoring continued to suffer. Power-play opportunities declined drastically, goaltenders got better, and the average goals scored per game stayed below 6 for a dozen seasons. Until this season.Whether the scoring uptick can be attributed to a culmination of rule changes, smarter shot selection, worse goaltending or evolved tactics — or some combination of all of that — one thing is certain: The NHL is a scorer’s league again, and the 2018-19 iteration is the most entertaining in nearly three decades. Players in the NHL are scoring at a prodigious pace. Tampa Bay’s Nikita Kucherov is on pace to score 125 points, which would be tied for the highest point tally of the new millennium. If they keep up their current clip, Edmonton’s Connor McDavid would score 122 points, Chicago’s Patrick Kane 119 points and Colorado’s Mikko Rantanen 117 points. All of these point totals would smash each player’s previous career high. This makes sense given the climate of the NHL this season — it’s the highest-scoring season since the one that took place immediately after the lockout of 2004-05. There are currently 40 players scoring at least a point per game.1Among players who have played in at least half of their team’s games. If the season ended today, it would be the highest number since 1995-96, when 42 finished the season with a point per game or better. This is excellent news for a league that’s constantly tinkering with its rulebook to increase scoring.For the first time in more than a decade, the average goals scored per NHL game has surpassed 6. But unlike previous spikes in scoring, there weren’t any sweeping changes made to the rulebook before the season,2The league did reduce the size of goaltending equipment again, but whether that meaningfully affects scoring numbers is up for debate. so what exactly is going on?An obvious stat to look at is the average number of power-play opportunities teams are getting each game. More man advantages, it would seem, might lead to more quality scoring opportunities. But power-play opportunities per game have actually decreased steadily since 2005-06, the season after the lockout, and are static when compared with last season, when the average goals scored per game was below 6.Shooters do appear to be taking better shots in five-on-five scenarios. The average for the league in expected goals per 60 minutes per team3Expected goals functions as a proxy for shot quality. is 2.38, according to data from Corsica Hockey — up from 2.19 in 2015-16. And shooters are actually performing better than the expected goals model suggests they should be: The league average goals per 60 minutes per team is 2.49. A 10th of a goal may not seem like a lot, but it translates to about 254 more goals scored per season. Shots against per game have remained fairly stable since the lockout of 2004-05, which makes it somewhat difficult to explain the sudden glut. read more

NFL week 8 guide to fantasy football

Play ‘Em Ryan Fitzpatrick: Is there a hotter quarterback in the NFL than Fitzpatrick? Since taking over as the Bills quarterback, the Harvard grad has thrown for 969 yards with eleven touchdowns and four interceptions. Fitzpatrick should have no trouble against Kansas City, which has allowed eight touchdowns to opposing quarterbacks. Fitzpatrick is a great sleeper and worth a waiver claim against the Chiefs. Carson Palmer: Palmer erupted last week against Atlanta with 412 yards and three touchdowns. Look for Palmer to air it out against a Dolphins defense that has allowed back-to-back 300-yard passing games. Ryan Torain: Despite two fumbles, Torain turned in a solid performance last week against Chicago with 125 rushing yards. With Clinton Portis likely out, Torain will continue to get the majority of the carries against a Detroit run defense that allows 139 rushing yards per game. Thomas Jones and Jamaal Charles: Jones continues to be a factor and is a must-start against Buffalo. Last week against Jacksonville, Jones and Charles combined for 196 yards with two touchdowns. Quarterback Matt Cassel seems to have found the passing game, allowing Jones and Charles to run wild. Pierre Garcon: Garcon’s role will increase with Austin Collie recovering from hand surgery and Dallas Clark out for the year with a wrist injury. Defenses will continue to focus on Reggie Wayne, which will free up Garcon. Last week, Garcon had 103 yards and a touchdown. Coming off a bye, expect the Colts to take advantage of the worst passing defense in the NFL. Kenny Britt: Another receiver having a breakout year (seven touchdowns) is Britt. Britt torched the Eagles last week, 225 yards with three touchdowns. Britt has a tough task this week against the Chargers’ top-ranked pass defense, but at this point Britt is considered a starter. He has recorded a touchdown in five straight games. Bench ‘Em Matt Hasselbeck: Don’t be fooled by the chemistry between Hasselbeck and receiver Mike Williams. Seattle’s last two games were against Chicago and Arizona respectively. This week, Hasselbeck faces an improved Raiders defense that allowed Kyle Orton to complete 12 passes last week. The Raiders rank fifth in the league with 192 passing yards allowed per game. Ryan Mathews: One of the biggest disappointments this season has been Mathews. He has yet to eclipse 100 rushing yards and is losing carries to Mike Tolbert and Darren Sproles. This week, Mathews faces a Titans run defense that ranks 10th in the league. Mathews may breakout soon, but not this week. Michael Bush: Bush continues to be productive, but the problem is Darren McFadden. McFadden continues to shine and that leaves Bush playing the backup role. Last week, Bush had 52 yards and a touchdown. Expect Bush to struggle against a Seattle defense that allows 70 yards per game on the ground. Fred Jackson: Due to Fitzpatrick’s performances, Jackson has looked like an afterthought in Buffalo. Jackson carried 23 times for 73 yards against Baltimore last week. The Bills will be tested against a stellar Kansas City run defense. Consider Jackson a flex option in deeper leagues. Wes Welker: The Patriots passing game is not the same without Randy Moss, and Welker is struggling without him too. Last week, Welker had four catches for 25 yards. Defenses will continue to locate Welker and force Deion Branch or Brandon Tate to step up. Welker is considered a No. 3 Fantasy option from here on out. read more

Danish FA reports Nicolai Jorgensen death threats

first_imgNicolai Jorgensen has received numerous death threats and abuse from supporters who were disappointed that he missed keeping the penalty shot against Croatia that led to the exit of Denmark from the World Cup.Following the abuses and threats, the Danish Football Association has reported death threats made against the striker, Nicolai Jorgensen to the Police.Jorgensen, who plays for Feyenoord in Holland, was amongst the three Danish players to miss from the spot during the shootout. But has come up to face more violent threats his miss that led to Denmark’s exit from the World Cup in Russia.Euro 2020Euro 2020 Qualifiers Betting: 06/09/19 Stuart Heath – September 6, 2019 With the international break in full-swing, here at Ronaldo.com we are going to take a look at Thursday’s Euro 2020 qualifiers match-betting odds.With a…“Our society must never accept death threats, neither against players or politicians. It is completely unacceptable and indecent, and we are reporting the case to the police to end this madness” the Danish FA said according to Sky Sports.Jorgensen has been attracting interest from the premier league, with Newcastle reportedly preparing a club record fee to sign the striker from Feyenoord.last_img read more

Rangers manager Steven Gerrard calls for more discipline

first_imgRangers Football Club manager Steven Gerrard has called on his players to reduce their number of cautions after their 10-man win over St. Mirren.Rangers had a player sent off in their opening game against draw Aberdeen away from home, after striker Alfredo Morelos was sent off for a flick on defender Scott McKenna.The player’s dismissal was overturned and the decision reaped benefits as he opened the scoring for the Gers on Sunday against St. Mirren before defender Conor Goldson gave Rangers a comfortable 2-0 lead.Steven Gerrard saw his team reduced to ten men on the half-hour mark when Ross McCrorie was shown a straight red card.Gerrard who was pretty vocal about the sending off of Morelos in their first game decided against making any for the offense committed by McCrorie on Sunday.“I’m very happy with the result and performance in the circumstances. Again, we’ve got down to 10 men.” Gerrard said, according to Evening Times.Steven Gerrard, Michael OwenOwen reveals why Liverpool didn’t offer Gerrard a new contract Manuel R. Medina – September 6, 2019 According to Owen, the Reds wanted to sell Gerrard two years before he left the club and that’s why they didn’t offer him a contract renewal.“I thought that was the correct decision. The referee got that one right.“The response from my team, every single one of them rolled their sleeves up and did what they had to do.“It was completely different to last week when we felt hard done by, said our piece and got justice in terms of the decision being overturned.“I thought the officials were really, really good today. They got the decision spot on and we’ve got no complaints.“I’ve spoken to the team and praised them for the result and clean sheet. But I’ve also spoken about discipline and composure out there.“It’s difficult enough with 11 men. We are picking up too many red and yellow cards for my liking. But we’ll learn, grow and keep going.”last_img read more