Demi Lovato Announces Treatment Scholarship

first_imgDemi Lovato has partnered with CAST Recovery to create The Lovato Treatment Scholarship in honor of her dad, Patrick Lovato, who passed away in part due to untreated mental health and addiction issues.Demi has battled these issues throughout her life, and she understands what’s at stake. At the same time, effective treatment is costly, and many can’t afford the care they need.The Lovato Treatment Scholarship will cover expenses for someone struggling with mental health and/or addiction issues, including the costs for one of CAST Recovery’s transitional living homes, as well as the clinical services provided at CAST’s outpatient program.Demi knows the CAST Recovery team well. She continues to work with them directly, and trusts that their programs offer some of the best services available.For those interested in applying for The Lovato Treatment Scholarship, please email us your story at [email protected] Let us know who you are and why you are seeking help.Demi and the CAST Recovery team wish they could help everyone, but unfortunately they can’t. And while the scholarship will only be able to help one person at a time, Demi will continue to speak out on these issues and lend their voice to those in need.For those who need immediate help and cannot afford treatment, please go to www.treatment4addiction.com for all of what SAMHSA’s database has to offer plus so much more.Source:CAST Recoverylast_img read more

From Game of Thrones to The Crown the woman who turns actors

first_img“I liked his face,” said Ware, pointing in the programme at a young blond actor named Elliot Baxter. “I thought he could be a good Chernobylly-type soldier.”“Yes!” said Gold. “I thought he could be a Chernobylly type too.”Gold was midway through working on an epic Sky-HBO five-parter called Chernobyl, about the 1986 nuclear disaster, which had more than 100 speaking parts. (“Whoops,” the screenwriter Craig Mazin told me, “these things pile up.”) Gold had been casting it since last September and it was due to start filming in April. Although she had already confirmed the actors Jared Harris, Emily Watson and Stellan Skarsgård for the three lead roles, there were still plenty of unfilled parts. The exact number kept changing – 102 one week, 109 the next – as the script was still being revised. Gold and Robert Sterne, with whom she was casting the show, were hunting for mostly British actors who could convincingly play 1980s Soviet soldiers and firemen facing near-certain death by exposure to radiation. So far, most had been too chatty, too gestural, too cheerful.Chernobyl was one of many tasks that required attention. Gold was also firming up who would play Prince Philip in the third series of The Crown, calling in actors to audition for a movie about Nell Gwynn, casting a remake of Shogun, and starting work on the next Star Wars instalment, for which she kept being summoned to secretive meetings at Pinewood Studios. Sitting by her desk, which has two drawers, one labelled “home/family/personal” and the other “CASTING”, Gold tried to count how many projects she was working on. “It would be the end of my career if I admit I’m doing eight at once,” she said, serious and entirely unserious at the same time, a typical mode. “Let’s say six … Maybe we should just say four. One at a time!” She paused. “Things stagger around in an annoying manner.” Advertisement Earlier this year, the casting director Nina Gold sat at the back of the stalls of the Criterion theatre in the West End and watched a group of students from the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland perform their showcase. After three years at drama school, each actor had a couple of three-minute scenes to impress a silent audience of agents and casting directors on their lunch hour. Gold slid down in her seat, as if wanting to remain unseen. Every now and then, she scribbled something next to a name in her programme, drew a circle around a face.At the end, Gold bolted through the foyer, past piles of photographs of the students laid out like market wares, and drove vigorously across London in her tiny electric car. “How the fuck do they do it?” she said. “You look at those kids, even the ones who weren’t that brilliant, and they were really giving it their all, weren’t they? They had to get up there. I mean, can you imagine?” Over 30-odd years, Gold has become the most powerful casting director in the UK, her taste shaping everything from Game of Thrones to Bridget Jones’s Baby, yet she can still be mystified by what actors do and why they do it.Back in her office, which occupies the front room of her large Edwardian house in north-west London, Gold and her assistant Martin Ware discussed the showcase. Login/Register With: Advertisement Twitter LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Facebook Advertisementlast_img read more