Horrific bushfire season to force interest rates to record low

first_imgThat was expected to push the Reserve Bank board to cut its cash rate target by 0.25 percentage points to 0.5 per cent at its first 2020 monetary policy meeting – set for February 4 in Sydney.The current season – which doesn’t end until May – has so far seen around 11m hectares of land and over 1900 homes burnt in wildfires across four Australian states. Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:58Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:58 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD432p432p216p216p180p180pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenHow much do I need to retire?00:58More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus10 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market10 hours ago Burnt property seen in Clifton Creek January 9, 2020 as extreme fire danger was forecast for the north of Victoria on Friday. Picture: Luis Ascui/Getty Images.The fallout from Australia’s worst bushfire season since Black Saturday has almost guaranteed interest rates will drop to a new historic low within weeks.This as experts warn of a high risk of broader economic impacts off the 2019-2020 bushfire season – including mounting insurance costs, mortgage delinquencies, damage to agriculture, tourism, household spending and worker productivity from enduring air pollution. Bayside property market on the up in 2020 Middle Brisbane seeing strongest home price growthcenter_img MORE: Thousands open homes to bushfire evacuees The homes of Beau Williams and his father Brian Williams were lost during bushfires in late 2019 at Noosa. Picture: Peter Wallis.Moody’s Investors Service said as of January 7, the Insurance Council of Australia tallied 8,985 bushfire related insurance claims lodged in New South Wales, Victoria, Queensland and South Australia. The figure was for the period beginning September 2019 when the first seasonal bushfires broke out in Queensland. The Insurance Council believe total insurance losses could run up a high as $700m “as many more claims are lodged over the coming weeks”.Moody’s Investors Service expected the lion’s share of the claims to be worn by Queensland firm Suncorp Group, through subsidiary AAI Limited, and Insurance Australia Group “because of their significant market share in home and motor insurance”.Moody’s Analytics economist Katrina Ell warned “the risk of there being broader macroeconomic spillovers this season are high given the scale of the fires”. “Odds were already high that the Reserve Bank of Australia will cut interest rates at its next meeting, in February, to bring the cash rate to 0.5 per cent. The fires increase those odds”.She said “it could be some months before efforts move from fire containment to rebuilding”.The ASX rate tracker yesterday saw the market swing towards a 60 per cent expectation of a rate cut to 0.5 per cent.Ms Ell said “bushfires in Australia have not tended to have an aggregate impact on the economy; instead there have been severe localised impacts. But the risk of there being broader macroeconomic spillovers this season are high given the scale of the fires as well as the fact that it is still early in the bushfire season and the existing fires are yet to be contained.”According to Moody’s Investors Service “mortgage delinquencies will increase in affected areas, due to the economic disruption and the damage caused by the fires”.It said “insurance, relief measures and loan features mitigate risks” and help “to limit mortgage delinquencies or preventing them escalating to defaults and losses”. – FOLLOW SOPHIE FOSTER ON TWITTERlast_img read more

One Premier League club losing £9m-a-week

first_imgOne unnamed Premier League club is losing a staggering £9m-a-week due to the coronavirus suspension. Premier League fixtures are currently suspended until April 30 due to the coronavirus crisis ( The Mirror reports they may have to take out a £100m bank loan to cover their potential losses during the coronavirus lockdown. That is the real cost facing one of the top clubs during the crisis and why some have now been forced into looking at potential pay cuts and deferrals for their players.Advertisement It comes because the clubs are still having to pay out their biggest costs – player wages – during the lockdown without any income. They are facing the potential nightmare of having to pay back up to £750m in TV cash to broadcasters, they are missing out on gate receipts, sponsorship deals and significant match day revenues. read also:EPL richest owners: Newcastle claim top spot with £320BN None of the clubs know how long the crisis will last and how many weeks or months they will have to go on without any games. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Promoted ContentBirds Enjoy Living In A Gallery Space Created For Them9 Facts You Should Know Before Getting A Tattoo7 Ways To Understand Your Girlfriend Better8 Superfoods For Growing Hair Back And Stimulating Its GrowthBest Car Manufacturers In The WorldMind-Bending Technology That Was Predicted Before It AppearedA Hurricane Can Be As Powerful As 10 Atomic Bombs5 Of The World’s Most Unique Theme ParksWhy Go Veg? 7 Reasons To Do This7 Ways To Understand Your Girlfriend Better6 Incredibly Strange Facts About Hurricanes11 Most Immersive Game To Play On Your Table Topcenter_img Loading… last_img read more

See archaeology in action at Versailles State Park Tuesday

first_imgVersailles, In. — The public can tour an archaeological survey, chat with archaeologists, and learn about the history of Versailles State Park during a special program on Tuesday, August 14.The program runs from 1 to 4 p.m. at the Oak Grove Shelter.Representatives from Ball State University’s Applied Anthropology Laboratories (AAL), along with AAL field students and staff from the DNR Division of Historic Preservation & Archaeology (DHPA) will be on site to lead the program.AAL staff will offer short tours of the archaeological site, which includes shovel test digs and surveying sites. Additionally, staff from the park and DHPA will offer informational and educational activities, including artifact displays, artifact identification, hands-on activities and more.At 2 p.m., local resident and historian Bill Dallman will talk about the history of the land and the families who lived there.The program is free after paying the standard park admission fee of $7 per in-state vehicle and $9 per out-of-state vehicle.The public program is one element of a targeted archaeological survey to uncover what remains of 19th-century life at several sites within the park. Archaeologists will use ground-penetrating radar and other methods to survey footpaths, privies, outbuildings and hidden home foundations.The Versailles area is historically significant because it was among the first planned towns in early Indiana. The park’s historic home sites are well preserved and offer a trove of information on daily life in early Indiana.This project has been funded in part by a grant from the U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service’s Historic Preservation Fund, administered by the DHPA.last_img read more