The refugee crisis in black and white

first_imgAfter they’ve survived a harrowing trip across the Mediterranean in a crowded rubber boat, fleeing war and violence in the Middle East and Africa, many refugees do something anyone might do when they reach a safe harbor — they take out their cellphones and capture that once-inconceivable moment.To Maciek Nabrdalik, a Polish documentary photographer and 2017 Nieman Fellow, it’s a simple, natural reaction. But as refugees came ashore on the beach of Lesbos, Greece, late last year, it was the angry reaction of another photojournalist that captured Nabrdalik’s eye. For him, it exemplified the stereotypes now rising in European Union countries.“A photographer working for one of the biggest wire services, talking to two volunteers, said ‘When I see those people jumping out of the boat and taking selfies I’m so [angry] I don’t even take my camera out,’” Nabradalik said at a program last Wednesday at the Harvard Ed Portal that examined the politics and prejudices surrounding the migration crisis in Europe.“I found this man at that very moment guilty of what people in my country and Europe think of the refugees.”In 2015 the International Organization for Migration reported that more than 1 million refugees from Syria, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Iraq, Nigeria, Somalia, and other countries had crossed into Europe, mostly by sea. This year’s tally has already passed 300,000. The media has called it the greatest movement of people since World War II, and it has been deadly: In 2015 more than 3,700 migrants died trying to make the crossing, including many children.Cambridge residents Nani Jansen Reventlon (from left), her husband Andreas Reventlon, and Harvard lecturer Louie Dean Valencia-Garcia and grad student Ariel Elizarov converse among the exhibit. Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff Photographer“Behind every single one of those numbers is an individual with a story, with a life, with hopes, with dreams, with nightmares, and these are the things that we don’t often see,” said Nkem Ifejika, a 2017 Nieman Fellow and presenter on the BBC World Service, who moderated the program. “Whenever we discuss refugees we use words such as ‘swamping,’ as if they are sludge, or words like ‘swarm,’ as if human beings are locusts, or ‘flood’ as if they are like an inanimate, destructive, uncontrollable phenomenon.”A collection of Nabrdalik’s work called “Refugee Crisis” was the focal point for the panel discussion, which included three other Nieman Fellows: Berlin-based reporter and columnist Georg Diez, German television correspondent Christian Feld, and Karin Pettersson, the political editor in chief at Aftonbladet, Scandinavia’s largest daily newspaper.Pettersson, who was an important voice on the political left in Sweden during the refugee debate there over the last two years, said that many Europeans lack perspective on the crisis. “I believe [the images from the front line] had an impact on civil society and initiatives from citizens to help refugees, and impacted policymakers in the EU for a short period of time — but that effect was not lasting. The refugee crisis isn’t over, rather the opposite.”Determined to bring awareness to the necessity of equal human rights, Nabrdalik followed the refugees on their journeys from Lesbos through Europe, documenting their plight in pictures as they went. It is a mission he said, not one he was assigned, but one he was called to, photographing them from a whole new perspective.“You are moved but feel you can’t do anything. This exhibition and its simple form is meant to be a conversation-starter,” said Nabrdalik. “I don’t treat it as artwork. It’s not a show that I would like you to go away with seeing nice frames and complimenting me for them … but hope for change.”Neman Fellows Maciek Nabrdalik (from left), Karin Pettersson, Georg Diez, and Christian Feld participated in a panel discussion. Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff PhotographerOn assignment, Diez also took a trip to Greece to witness the humanitarian crisis firsthand. He said this could be a historic moment for Europe, an opportunity to model how to deal with sudden migration from war-torn or economically depressed countries.“This is what it means to be a citizen. You don’t ask where you come from, you just help. On a one-on-one basis you build something, but it has turned into a politicized field of hatred and cynicism,” he said. “And people to this day don’t talk about the facts.”Feld said that so far, the European Union has failed to effectively deal with the influx of refugees or rally member states to share the burden.“The 28 member states did not use their potential in terms of power and wealth to tackle what has to be called a humanitarian catastrophe,” he said. “The Union was not a union at all. This willingness to compromise seems to have vanished during this crisis.”About 100 people attended the program, which also served as the opening of Nabrdalik’s exhibition, which will be on display at the Ed Portal’s Crossings Gallery in Allston through Oct. 27.Eva Rosenberg, arts program manager at the Ed Portal, said the issues his photos address could not be more timely or important.“The Ed Portal hopes to create the opportunity for dialogue about important issues of our day. Hosting five Nieman Fellows in conversation about the crisis epitomizes this,” she said.Nancy Kalajian of Somerville came to the program sensitive to the plight of refugees because of her family history.“I am a grandchild of Armenian Genocide survivors,” she said. “When I watch TV and see so many refugees in crisis it seems that very little has changed in over 100 years for people in many parts of the world.”Nabrdalik’s experience at the border left deep marks on him. Exhausted, hungry and clutching a small pack of whatever remained from their lives, these people were willing to risk drowning to flee the violence of their homeland, he said.“The refugees thought of this moment as a rebirth, very often they would say it’s a new life for them. I think if the media would show refugees with their cellphones just like us, maybe people would like to have them as neighbors,” said Nabrdalik. “But I’m not sure photography is enough.”last_img read more

Whicker: Even the small victories bring out the party in the Dodgers

first_imgNHL teams do not do the clubhouse party when they win conference championships. There’s one silver goal and they tend to break all blood-alcohol records when they get it. Until then, nothing matters. Same with the NBA.But if the Dodgers somehow win the West on Sunday, there will be another bacchanal. Same thing if they hold a one-game playoff for the West title on Monday, at home. And if they don’t win the West and yet win the wild card, there will be another.Has a team ever won a World Series through Brut force? “It’s obviously gigantic,” Ross Stripling said, as the beer and the champagne flew. “No matter what, we’ve got a chance to win the division. This is fun in here right now, but I don’t think this is going to get carried away. We’re going to play game No. 162 and we’re going to go all out.”The win achieved one significant thing. It removed the possibility that the Dodgers would fly all night to St. Louis for a 3:05 game in Busch Stadium, the equivalent of a First Four game in the NCAA basketball tournament. That was the nightmare itinerary: St. Louis Monday, Milwaukee or Chicago Tuesday, and then the NL Championship Series, provided anything was left.Related Articles Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error Cody Bellinger homer gives Dodgers their first walkoff win of season The way Manager Dave Roberts sees it, this is not excess and it’s not even wretched. For all the spitballs we’ve thrown at baseball this season, the game still demands more on a daily basis than any other, and it particularly enjoys messing with the hippocampus and the neurotransmitters.In Roberts’ eyes the Dodgers weren’t popping the cork on champagne, they were releasing six months of high maintenance.“You have to celebrate when you win,” Roberts said.Cleveland, for instance, beat four American League Central teams that are a combined 122 games below .500 with a run differential of minus-582. They clinched on Sept. 15 and they let it flow, without apology.And there were Dodgers, here and there around this room at AT&T Park, who hadn’t won.There was Max Muncy, not even on the 40-man roster a year ago.“I was sitting on my couch,” Muncy said, “starting to get ready for the next season.”All the Dodgers would be headed for the couch if not for Muncy. He leads the club with 33 home runs and a .568 slugging percentage. He had a triple Saturday, and then a double off lefty Will Smith, in the eighth, that turned a 6-5 lead into 8-5.“At some point there will be a moment when I look back,” Muncy said, “but right now I’m trying to enjoy it.”There was Matt Kemp, who came back from low times and low finishes and propped up the Dodgers in the first half. There was Caleb Ferguson, another mystery guest who struck out 59 in 49 innings and is a candidate for the ever-shifting Dodgers rotation next season.Roberts felt they all deserved a whiff of the grape. A second stiff is not guaranteed.“When we were down 10 games down early in the season, I don’t think anybody got really frustrated,” Stripling said. “There’s too much talent in the room, and we’ve won the division too many times in a row.”But when is panic disguised as over-vigilance? Near the end of this game, closer Kenley Jansen warmed up for what would have been a second consecutive save. Then the Dodgers got four in the top of the ninth.Roberts sent Zac Rosscup to finish up. Rosscup walked Brandon Crawford and got an out. Here came Jansen, for 16 unnecessary pitches, one of which became a double by Gregor Blanco.The Dodgers might need Jansen on Sunday, Monday and Tuesday, so this was problematic to everyone but Roberts. “We had to win this game,” Roberts said.With a noon game Sunday, Happy Hour was still in full swing at 5 p.m. Kemp did admit to feeling “a little sticky,” but then he opened a red-and-white beer bottle and sprayed some more.He took a look at two large, full bins and said, “I hope we got enough liquor for tomorrow.”Maybe, but you know how last call can sneak up. Fire danger is on Dave Roberts’ mind as Dodgers head to San Francisco center_img Dodgers hit seven home runs, sweep Colorado Rockies PreviousLos Angeles Dodgers’ Matt Kemp (27) celebrates scoring a run against the San Francisco Giants during the ninth inning of a baseball game in San Francisco, Saturday, Sept. 29, 2018. (AP Photo/Jim Gensheimer)Los Angeles Dodgers’ Yasiel Puig celebrates with teammates after clinching a playoff spot after beating the San Francisco Giants in a baseball game in San Francisco, Saturday, Sept. 29, 2018. (AP Photo/Jim Gensheimer)Los Angeles Dodgers’ Tim Locastro is bathed in beer and champagne as he celebrates with teammates after clinching a playoff spot after beating the San Francisco Giants in a baseball game in San Francisco, Saturday, Sept. 29, 2018. (AP Photo/Jim Gensheimer) SoundThe gallery will resume insecondsThe Los Angeles Dodgers celebrate clinching a playoff spot after beating the San Francisco Giants in a baseball game in San Francisco, Saturday, Sept. 29, 2018. (AP Photo/Jim Gensheimer)The Los Angeles Dodgers celebrate clinching a playoff spot after beating the San Francisco Giants in a baseball game in San Francisco, Saturday, Sept. 29, 2018. (AP Photo/Jim Gensheimer)The Los Angeles Dodgers celebrate clinching a playoff spot after beating the San Francisco Giants in a baseball game in San Francisco, Saturday, Sept. 29, 2018. (AP Photo/Jim Gensheimer)The Los Angeles Dodgers’ Yasiel Puig celebrates clinching a playoff spot after beating the San Francisco Giants in a baseball game in San Francisco, Saturday, Sept. 29, 2018. (AP Photo/Jim Gensheimer)Los Angeles Dodgers’ Matt Kemp (27) celebrates with Manny Machado (8) after scoring a run against the San Francisco Giants during the ninth inning of a baseball game in San Francisco, Saturday, Sept. 29, 2018. (AP Photo/Jim Gensheimer)Los Angeles Dodgers’ Joc Pederson (31) celebrates scoring a home run with Justin Turner (10) during the first inning of a baseball game in San Francisco, Saturday, Sept. 29, 2018. (AP Photo/Jim Gensheimer)San Francisco Giants’ Brandon Crawford (35) slides safe at home against Los Angeles Dodgers catcher Yasmani Grandal (9) during the second inning of a baseball game in San Francisco, Saturday, Sept. 29, 2018. (AP Photo/Jim Gensheimer)San Francisco Giants starting pitcher Dereck Rodriguez (57) throws against the Los Angeles Dodgers during the first inning of a baseball game in San Francisco, Saturday, Sept. 29, 2018. (AP Photo/Jim Gensheimer)San Francisco Giants catcher Nick Hundley (5) tags out Los Angeles Dodgers’ Max Muncy (13) at home during the third inning of a baseball game in San Francisco, Saturday, Sept. 29, 2018. (AP Photo/Jim Gensheimer)San Francisco Giants’ Abiatal Avelino (46) celebrates scoring a run after sliding into home against the Los Angeles Dodgers during the fifth inning of a baseball game in San Francisco, Saturday, Sept. 29, 2018. (AP Photo/Jim Gensheimer)San Francisco Giants’ Hunter Pence (8) scores to tie the game against the Los Angeles Dodgers during the fifth inning of a baseball game in San Francisco, Saturday, Sept. 29, 2018. (AP Photo/Jim Gensheimer)Los Angeles Dodgers’ Max Muncy (13) strikes out with runners on base against the San Francisco Giants during the fifth inning of a baseball game in San Francisco, Saturday, Sept. 29, 2018. (AP Photo/Jim Gensheimer)Los Angeles Dodgers’ Manny Machado (8) hits a RBI triple for the go ahead run against the San Francisco Giants during the eighth inning of a baseball game in San Francisco, Saturday, Sept. 29, 2018. (AP Photo/Jim Gensheimer)Los Angeles Dodgers’ Manny Machado (8) celebrates after hitting a RBI triple for the go ahead run against the San Francisco Giants during the eighth inning of a baseball game in San Francisco, Saturday, Sept. 29, 2018. (AP Photo/Jim Gensheimer)Los Angeles Dodgers’ Matt Kemp (27) celebrates scoring a run against the San Francisco Giants during the ninth inning of a baseball game in San Francisco, Saturday, Sept. 29, 2018. (AP Photo/Jim Gensheimer)Los Angeles Dodgers’ Yasiel Puig celebrates with teammates after clinching a playoff spot after beating the San Francisco Giants in a baseball game in San Francisco, Saturday, Sept. 29, 2018. (AP Photo/Jim Gensheimer)NextShow Caption1 of 17Los Angeles Dodgers’ Yasiel Puig celebrates with teammates after clinching a playoff spot after beating the San Francisco Giants in a baseball game in San Francisco, Saturday, Sept. 29, 2018. (AP Photo/Jim Gensheimer)ExpandSAN FRANCISCO — It seemed like an unseemly waste of bubbles, with so many opportunities to burst.The Dodgers celebrated at full bore Saturday after they beat the Giants, 10-6, and qualified for at least a wild card in the National League playoffs.But there was every reason to drink responsibly.Sunday is not a spring training game for them. They can still win or tie for the N.L. West championship, and the difference between that path and the chert rock gravel road that awaits the wild-card representative. How Dodgers pitcher Ross Stripling topped the baseball podcast empire Dodgers’ Max Muncy trying to work his way out of slow start last_img read more