Consumers Urged to Make Wise Purchases this Christmas

first_imgStory Highlights The Christmas season for many Jamaicans can be a joyous and wonderful time; however, after it has passed, many consumers regret transactions that were done in the marketplace.Speaking at a recent press briefing at The Courtleigh Hotel in New Kingston, Consumer Affairs Commission (CAC) Chairman, Kent Gammon, said that among the reasons for regret is buyers’ remorse.“When you go and make a very expensive purchase and you think you may have made a wrong choice, you may think that you have been overly influenced by a very crafty vendor. You must be aware of that, and it is something you need to guard against,” he says.He encourages consumers to not be overzealous in purchasing products, but to be wise in making decisions before buying.“Make sure that you can fit it within your budget, because it is very frustrating when you go over your budget and you can’t meet your other expenses as they come along,” Mr. Gammon tells JIS News.The Chairman is also urging consumers to only buy items that come with warranties, especially when purchasing electrical products.“You are required by the Consumer Protection Act to have a warranty, so you need to insist on it, and if you do not get one, please let us know in writing and we will certainly pay a visit to that provider. There are sanctions under our Act, because we need to have you protected when you spend your hard-earned money,” Mr. Gammon says.The Chairman further notes that consumers should ensure that the electrical appliances are working before leaving the store and that they have their receipts, “so that if you have any problems, you have redress”.For the 2017/18 financial year to date, the electrical equipment and appliances category has generated most complaints, accounting for 34.47 per cent of the total complaints made by consumers.The CAC is advising consumers to read all labels and manuals carefully; observe the manufacturer’s instructions in the use of any product purchased, as abuse or misuse may void the warranty coverage; ask about return policy and warranty; and to utilise the services of a store or certified electrician if installation is required.Meanwhile, Director at the National Compliance and Regulatory Authority (NCRA), Orine Henry, says the Authority is partnering with the CAC for the Christmas season to focus on toys, electrical appliances, Christmas lights, processed foods and clothing and shoes in terms of labelling.“What we are asking consumers to do is to be very careful when they are purchasing toys. Look at the labels and ensure that you take particular care (when looking) at hazard warnings and anything that could cause choking,” Ms. Henry says.Persons are also being encouraged to get safety gear for items such as bicycles, scooters and skateboards.As it relates to electrical appliances, consumers are being asked to look at labels to ensure that the manufacturer’s name, number and address are present as well as the serial number for the product and the supply voltage.“You also look for the approved certification mark, and a popular one is Underwriters Laboratories (UL)… . Once you see that mark, it is saying that the product has been certified,” the Director states.On another matter, Ms. Henry says consumers should ensure that the Christmas lights that are being purchased have the requisite labelling information and that they are working before leaving the store.For processed foods, Jamaicans are encouraged to be extremely careful by looking at the labels, ingredient listings, date marks and net quantity declarations.Ms. Henry adds that persons should purchase their products from reputable sources.“We are imploring consumers to make sure that you are informed at the point of sale,” she tells JIS News.The CAC is a fully funded Government agency, which was established to inform, educate and empower consumers to protect themselves in the marketplace.The Commission conducts market research, provides complaint-resolution services and runs an active consumer-education programme. The CAC operates under the Trade Act of 1955 and the Consumer Protection Act of 2005. The Christmas season for many Jamaicans can be a joyous and wonderful time; however, after it has passed, many consumers regret transactions that were done in the marketplace. “When you go and make a very expensive purchase and you think you may have made a wrong choice, you may think that you have been overly influenced by a very crafty vendor. You must be aware of that, and it is something you need to guard against,” he says. Speaking at a recent press briefing at The Courtleigh Hotel in New Kingston, Consumer Affairs Commission (CAC) Chairman, Kent Gammon, said that among the reasons for regret is buyers’ remorse.last_img read more

Injured in Pak firing 10dayold baby dies in Poonch dist

first_imgJammu: A 10-day-old baby, injured in heavy shelling by Pakistani troops along the Line of Control (LoC) in Jammu and Kashmir’s Poonch district, died at a hospital on Monday, police said.The infant, his mother Fatima Jan (35) and another civilian Mohammad Arif (40) were injured when mortar shells fired by Pakistan hit their village in Shahpur sector late Sunday. They were rushed to district hospital Poonch, where the minor succumbed to injuries, they added. Also Read – Uddhav bats for ‘Sena CM’Cross-border firing by Pakistani troops continued for the second successive day on Monday in the district, prompting strong and effective retaliation by Indian soldiers, an Army spokesperson said. “At about 1245 hours, Pakistan initiated unprovoked ceasefire violation by firing of small arms and shelling with mortars along LoC in Shahpur sector. Indian Army is retaliating befittingly,” he said. A police official said Jan and Arif were referred to the Government Medical College Hospital, Jammu, for specialised treatment, though their condition was stated to be “stable”. Also Read – Farooq demands unconditional release of all detainees in J&KMortars and small arms were used from across the border to target forward posts and villages in Shahpur, Saujiyan and Mendhar sectors between 5 pm and 10 pm on Sunday. Several houses were damaged in the firing, the official said. The Army spokesperson said information on casualties on the Pakistani side in the retaliatory action was not immediately available. On July 22, an Indian soldier was killed in Pakistani firing in Sunderbani sector of Rajouri district, while a civilian was injured in another incident of cross-border firing by Pakistan in Poonch sector on July 20.last_img read more

Yukons Sourtoe Cocktail still available but theft of one toe tough to

first_imgDAWSON CITY, Yn – A mummified human toe that is the key ingredient in a strange drinking ritual in Dawson City has been stolen.RCMP are searching for the suspects as well as the misappropriated member.The shrivelled, brown toe vanished Saturday after being added to an infamous sourtoe cocktail served by the Downtown Hotel in Dawson City, Yukon.Hotel manager Geri Colbourne says a couple came in late that night and requested the unique drink but the waitress was called away after pouring two shots. The toe was gone when she returned.The shrivelled brown toe is included in a shot of alcohol and, according to tradition, drinkers must allow it to touch their lips in order to join the Sourtoe Cocktail Club.There are spares, Colbourne said, but the donated toes can be difficult to come by.“We get people from all over the world coming here wanting to do the toe and it’s well known everywhere and it’s such a huge thing for Dawson City and for the Downtown Hotel,” Colbourne said. “Why would someone want to ruin that, you know? It just makes no sense to me at all.”RCMP Cpl. Jeff Myke says a theft investigation is underway, adding the toe represents a tradition that has been an important part of community history“It’s not every day that we investigate incidents like this, but the sourtoe represents a Dawson City tradition that has been an important part of the history here for many years,” he added.Paul Robitaille, manager of the Klondike Visitors Association, said reactions to the drink vary wildly.“There are strange things done in the midnight sun and the sourtoe is one of those things,” said Robitaille, who previously worked as a “captain” serving the sourtoe cocktail.“You get 85-year-old little old ladies that come in and do it without blinking an eye, and then you get macho men who cringe and can’t do it,” he said. “It’s a funny thing to see how people react to a sourtoe.”When not sitting in a shot glass, the toe rests on a bed of salt, which helps to keep it mummified. Despite the drink’s name, the petrified appendage doesn’t really add a unique taste, Robitaille said.“Generally, it almost makes a shot stronger because, you’ve got to think, it’s been in thousands of shots, right? So it’s kind of soaking up all the booze from the one before it and then it is sitting in the salt so it just adds a little bit of the saltiness to it. It’s not a repulsive taste at all.”Once it’s been used many, many times, a toe is retired and a new one is introduced into the rotation, explained Robitaille, who couldn’t put a precise figure on the number of times a single toe may be used.“That’s just a judgement call,” he said.This isn’t the first time a toe has gone missing, Robitaille said, adding several were swallowed when smaller digits, such as pinky toes, were used in the cocktails back in the 1990s.The hotel is offering a reward for the toe’s safe return and RCMP are searching for the suspects, as well as the misappropriated member. (The Canadian Press, CKRW)last_img read more