Groves reveals his plan to beat Froch in Saturday’s world title clash

first_imgGeorge Groves reveals his gameplan for beating world champion Carl Froch as they face each other at the final press conference before Saturday’s super-middleweight clash in Manchester.Hammersmith’s Groves is the underdog but insists he will cause an upset and dethrone the Nottingham man.Video courtesy of iFL TV. See also:Confident Groves squares up to Froch after final press conferenceGroves says Froch ‘has 48 hours to readjust’ after gameplan is revealedHearn predicts Groves will go on the attackRelaxed Groves unfazed by Froch – trainerFroch claims Groves will be ‘annihilated’Groves: Froch is wrong, I’m ready for himGroves stays cool at tense weigh-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 Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Stem Cell Headlines

first_img(Visited 66 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 Here’s a list of news reports about stem cells for those interested in either health or bioethics.Stem cell research continues to promise amazing treatments, yet the use of human embryos is ethically troublesome. Adult stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) offer ethical workarounds for embryonic stem cells in most cases. Here’s what’s developing on the stem cell front.Researchers take broad look at stem cells (Science Daily). “Sanford Research scientists recently published a review article in an issue of Stem Cells Translational Medicine focused on the study of and utility of adult-derived stem cells.” A new clinical trial opened for patients with rotator-cuff tears, using their own stem cells.Clonal reversal of ageing-associated stem cell lineage bias via a pluripotent intermediate (Nature Scientific Reports). This study looks at the potential for reversing aging with iPSCs treated to heal hematopoietic stem cells in the blood.The stem cell dynamics of wound healing (Medical Xpress). Researchers in Brussels are using mouse models to study how the body’s stem cells work to repair tissues in the skin. The research has been published in Nature Communications. See also Science Daily.Autophagy maintains the metabolism and function of young and old stem cells (Nature). How does the body keep its stem cells healthy over a lifetime? “Our results demonstrate that autophagy actively suppresses haematopoietic stem-cell metabolism by clearing active, healthy mitochondria to maintain quiescence and stemness, and becomes increasingly necessary with age to preserve the regenerative capacity of old haematopoietic stem cells.”Stem cells derived neuronal networks grown on a chip as an alternative to animal testing (Science Daily). Scientists at the University of Bern are experimenting with stem cells assays in “multi-electrode arrays capable of detecting the biological activity of Clostridium botulinum neurotoxins.” This method “could serve in minimizing animal experiments as well as provide a physiological relevant platform for drug-screening of neuroactive compounds.”Findings reveal effect of embryonic neural stem cell development on later nerve regeneration capacity (Medical Xpress).The cells responsible for neurogenesis in the mature brain are called adult neural stem cells, but little is known about their developmental origins. Now an international research collaboration led by Magdalena Götz, Professor of Physiological Genomics at LMU’s Biomedical Center and Director of the Institute for Stem Cell Research at the Helmholtz Zentrum Munich, has demonstrated that the mode of division of stem cells has a profound influence on the numbers of adult neural stem cells formed during embryonic development.Scientists wage fight against aging bone marrow stem cell niche (Science Daily). Scientists at Cincinnati Hospital are also looking at hematopoietic stem cells and how they age. Trouble is, the bone marrow also ages with the HSCs. These scientists “propose rejuvenating the bone marrow niche where HSCs are created.”DNA repair and replication links to pluripotency and differentiation capacity of pig iPS cells (PLoS One). This paper looks into whether iPSCs derived from pig cells are stable enough to be used in human treatments.Bioethics and Genome EditingScientists create artificial mouse ’embryo’ from stem cells for first time (Science Daily). Studying how mouse embryos develop is OK, but if mad scientists start creating human embryos from stem cells some day, it won’t matter if they came from adult stem cells or iPSCs. It will still be morally wrong. These scientists are looking for workarounds to the shortage of human embryos to play with, and the 13-day rule for destroying them.Bioethics: Democracy in vitro (Nature). In this Book Review, “Insoo Hyun weighs up a treatise exploring the ethical deliberations surrounding embryo research.” The book is Experiments in Democracy: Human Embryo Research and the Politics of Bioethics,  by J. Benjamin Hurlbut (Columbia University Press: 2017).US science advisers outline path to genetically modified babies (Nature). This related bioethics story should sound alarms. “Modified human embryos should be allowed if researchers meet strict criteria, says long-awaited National Academies report.”Safe and ethical ways to edit the human genome (The Conversation). Rosa Castro gives 10 guidelines for avoiding the ethical qualms about a brave new world of “designer babies.”First results of CRISPR gene editing of normal embryos released (New Scientist). It’s coming. The Chinese have already started. Is the world ready for direct editing of the human genome? Can ethics keep up with the technology? This liberal news service doesn’t seem overly concerned about it. It’s a way to cure deadly genetic diseases; isn’t that a moral thing? It always starts out that way, but eugenics waits in the wings. What happens to those born with the genetic disease? How will they be treated? Read about other issues, such as “mosaicism” – editing that doesn’t fix all the bugs.last_img read more

Why Real Estate Developers Are Ignoring the Middle Class

first_imgHousing for the wealthyBut not everyone in the industry is convinced. “Supply constrained — really?” joked one investment manager. He was referring to huge amounts of new housing being built in ultra-expensive cities like New York and San Francisco. The real issue seems to be that most of this new housing is for rich people. The newest housing tower in Vancouver, for instance, is selling studio apartments for over $1 million. “A lot of construction is happening but a lot of the new projects don’t seem to be affordable to locals,” Simon Fraser University professor Josh Gordon recently told the CBC.Many leaders within the real-estate industry share the assessment. “New homes that are developed tend to be for a high-income market,” reads PwC’s Emerging Trends report. “Few builders are targeting middle-income buyers.” High land and labor costs are partly to blame. “We can’t afford not to develop apartments at the high end,” one respondent said. But so is the real estate industry’s business model. Because affordable homes tend to generate “incremental profits rather than large windfalls,” it reads, most “builders have been targeting more affluent buyers.”Protesters in Vancouver, B.C., point to the disparity between wage increases and rent increases.Yet the reasons for this aren’t only financial. They also reflect a social calculation. The real estate industry knows that income inequality is at record highs in Canada and the U.S. It believes this gap will continue to grow. One result of income disparity is to make our society’s top cities inaccessible to regular people. The report likened the experience of living in these cities to attending an invitation-only party. “At the entrance to fashionable nightclubs or red-carpet opening nights, access is controlled through use of velvet ropes on brass stanchions,” it observed. “Bouncers let only select individuals gain entry — the others have to stand and look in from the outside.”The implication is clear. Cities like Vancouver have become exclusive hangouts for the wealthy. The rest of us are now passive observers of civic life, staring longingly from the periphery. “Just as the downtowns of cities ‘hollowed out’ in the second half of the last century, so too the middle class has been hollowing out,” the report reads. This is not just confined to places like Toronto, New York, and Los Angeles. Inequality is now spreading to secondary cities across the continent. “For these areas and many others, the velvet rope means increasing income segregation,” it reads. The real estate industry wants to be inside the velvet rope. It wants the company of rich people. And it’s abandoned the middle class on the sidelines.Many leaders within the industry realize that this is a risky strategy. By focusing so heavily on affluent customers the industry is alienating big sections of our society. “Rents are hitting levels that are unaffordable to most of the younger workforce,” the report explains. And with affordability overall “on the decline,” it adds, “the related strain on the social fabric is getting high-level attention.” Real estate leaders know that if prices keep rising there will come a point when the majority of people can simply no longer afford them. “Affordable housing may be the real estate industry’s vulnerable flank,” it reads. But for now many developers are opting to ignore it. The real estate industry knows there’s huge demand for less expensive homes. It’s aware that millions of people in Canada and the U.S. don’t have the financial means for a million-dollar mortgage. It gets that this is a growing problem. But real estate developers aren’t that interested in solving it. Land in cities such as Vancouver and Toronto is expensive. Developers — and the industry at large — make much bigger profits building luxury homes for wealthy people than affordable homes for the rest of us. It’s why so few new developments are targeted towards average incomes.But the real estate industry is not only making a financial calculation. It’s making a social calculation as well. Income inequality has been growing steadily for the past few decades. It’s now at levels not seen in over a century. The real estate industry predicts the gap between rich and poor will continue to widen. It’s aligning itself with our society’s wealthiest members. And it’s ignoring the middle class. Geoff Dembicki is a reporter for The Tyee, where this article was originally published. His book, Are We Screwed? How a New Generation Is Fighting to Survive Climate Change will be published later this year. Those are some of the takeaways from Emerging Trends in Real Estate — United States and Canada 2017, a report produced by PwC and the Urban Land Institute. Its authors describe it as “one of the most highly regarded and widely read forecast reports in the real estate industry.” Its conclusions were drawn from a wide-ranging survey of investors, developers, advisers, consultants and other real estate industry leaders. “Researchers personally interviewed more than 500 individuals and survey responses were received from more than 1,500 individuals,” the report explains. A shortage of “regular rents”The report’s authors declined an interview. But many of the experts quoted in the report spoke candidly about the industry. Some of them are concerned about the direction it’s heading. “We’re not paying enough attention to affordable housing, and I don’t mean low-income or government-subsidized. Just regular rents. No new buildings are providing that kind of product,” said one CEO. “Time will tell if that’s going to come back to haunt us. Not everybody makes $75,000 to $100,000 a year.”Housing has become so expensive in cities like Vancouver, San Francisco, and New York that the industry has amended its definition of “affordable.” There is now a “distinction between ‘big-A’ and ‘small-A’ affordability,” the report explains. Big-A affordable housing is what most of us are familiar with. It refers to housing for our society’s poorest members, often built with the support of governments. Small-A affordable housing refers to the needs of people earning $31,000 to $87,000 per year. “In many markets,” the report observes, “middle-income households… are housing stressed, spending more than a third of their income on housing costs.”The industry knows that this is a problem. A society in which a majority of people can no longer afford your product is bad for business. Increasing numbers of real estate leaders seem to be paying attention. “Housing costs and availability were rated by Emerging Trends survey participants as being ‘considerably important’ issues,” the report reads, “increasing in importance this year when compared with the ‘moderate importance’ given to future home prices and affordable/workforce housing in our survey a year ago.” But acknowledging a problem is only the first step. The real estate industry doesn’t seem interested in actually addressing it.Many industry leaders have opted to blame others instead. The reason housing is so expensive in cities like Vancouver, they believe, is because local communities are resistant to new development. “[These communities] are engaged in a rear-guard action, contrary to their own self-interest,” the report reads. And governments are also blamed: they must lift restrictions and approve projects faster. “Government needs to increase the supply [of new homes],” one respondent told the report’s authors. “If there was enough supply, there would be no affordability issue.” RELATED ARTICLES A Forgotten Tool to Solve the Housing Crisis Can Low-Income Housing Be Energy-Efficient and Affordable?Green and ‘Nutritious’ Affordable Housing?Boston Mulls a New Template for Urban HousingAffordable Housing Is Leading Green BuildingSeniors Snap Up Houses Meant for Young BuyersMaking Green Affordable, Part 1Making Green Affordable, Part 2last_img read more

PH chess team eyes 7 golds or more in 2017 ASEAN Para Games

first_imgPH chess player Menandro Redor. Photo by Randolph B. LeongsonHoping to pick up where they left off, the Philippines chess para athletes are loooling to surpass their six-gold medal haul in 2015 and aiming for seven this time in Kuala Lumpur.But Menandro Redor, one of the country’s leading para athlete in chess, thinks that with the chess team’s stringent preparation it could even exceed its target in the 2017 ASEAN Para Games this month.ADVERTISEMENT Hotel says PH coach apologized for ‘kikiam for breakfast’ claim Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. MOST READ Celebrity chef Gary Rhodes dies at 59 with wife by his side NATO’s aging eye in the sky to get a last overhaul Robredo should’ve resigned as drug czar after lack of trust issue – Panelo PH targets 27 golds in 2017 ASEAN Para Games “We may get more than just seven golds because we had intense training for this. We joined different local and international tournaments just to prepare,” said Redor in Filipino. “Our coaches have been taking care of us and we’re so prepared that we’re sure of what we can accomplish.”Redor, who will also serve as the Philippines’ flagbearer for the opening ceremonies, ha four-gold haul for the visually impaired 2 division, which is for partially blind participants, in the last staging of the biennial games in Singapore.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSBoxers Pacquiao, Petecio torchbearers for SEA Games openingThe PH chess team will also lean on wheelchair-bound FIDE Master Sander Severino and Henry Lopez as they gun to sweep the individual and team events of standard and rapid.“We’ve already swept our category, so our goal now is to do that in the other categories. It also helps that we’ve got a women’s team now so it’s really possible that we can get the top spot this time,” Redor said. Lacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’ Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games03:07PH billiards team upbeat about gold medal chances in SEA Games05:25PH boxing team determined to deliver gold medals for PH03:04Filipino athletes share their expectations for 2019 SEA Games00:45Onyok Velasco see bright future for PH boxing in Olympics02:25PH women’s volleyball team motivated to deliver in front of hometown crowd01:27Filipino athletes get grand send-off ahead of SEA Games00:36Manny Pacquiao part of 2019 SEA Games opening ceremony Celebrity chef Gary Rhodes dies at 59 with wife by his side View comments LATEST STORIES The 32-year-old woodpusher isn’t discounting the capacity of the opposition with Indonesia posing the biggest threat to the Philippines’ quest for gold.But Redor is confident with what the chess team can deliver for the delegation, saying, “In chess, we’re sure that we’ll bring home golds.”Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Trump signs bills in support of Hong Kong protesters Ethel Booba on hotel’s clarification that ‘kikiam’ is ‘chicken sausage’: ‘Kung di pa pansinin, baka isipin nila ok lang’last_img read more