North Star Is Rapidly Changing

first_imgThe North Star (Polaris) has brightened by 150% since Ptolemy observed it 2000 years ago, says the American Astronomical Society (see report on Science Now).  If the differences from those in ancient times are real, “these changes are 100 times larger than predicted by current theories of stellar evolution.”  Polaris is also a pulsating Cepheid variable, but its pulses have been erratic lately.  One astronomer surmises, “Polaris may be experiencing a rare and rapidly changing period in its evolution.”Finding the North Star is a required skill for any northern-hemisphere camper.  It is also a conversation starter on how much science can know about processes that supposedly take billions of years.(Visited 7 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Be aware of increased timber thefts

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Current high prices for white oak and black walnut timber have created a recent increase in timber theft. Tree theft in rural areas of Ohio should be of concern to residents and landowners, and the Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR) Division of Forestry offers tips to help residents prevent this activity.“Timber is a marketable commodity, with well-formed trees of some species having substantial value,” said Dan Balser, chief of the Division of Forestry. “Keeping an eye out for timber theft on your property or on your neighbor’s land can go a long way to deterring theft and significant monetary and resource losses. We have recently seen timber thefts from both public and private land in Ohio.”Timber poachers often work in secluded areas not visible from residences. They often remove the most valuable lower log section of the tree and leave upper sections and limbs. Thieves use small equipment like small trailers and winches, or logging equipment like loaders and large trucks.ODNR offers these tips when illegal tree theft activity is suspected:• Report suspicious activity to local law enforcement immediately. Do not personally confront anyone working a suspected timber theft operation. • Leave contact information with a neighbor, especially if you are an absentee woodland owner. Keep them informed of your plans for the property. • Inspect your property regularly. Cable or gate access lanes and install locks. • Mark all of your boundaries with paint or signs to deter potential thieves. • Conduct a timber inventory and estimate the value of your timber. • When conducting a timber sale, work with a professional forester to know what resources you own, follow a management plan with defined outcomes, use sustainable forestry practices, solicit multiple bids, research any potential buyer or logger, require a bond, use a contract for harvesting work and include best management practices to protect soil and water.Resources are available at callB4Ucut.com/ohio or by calling 877-424-8288.last_img read more

Two Ohio wheat farmers leading the nation both near and far

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Joel PenhorwoodThough Ohio is not a top state for wheat production, the state continues to be a hotbed for national leaders in agriculture. A pair of farmers in Ohio have taken their wheat expertise to the national level this year as they each are currently serving as chairs of their national organizations.Doug Goyings of Paulding and Rachael Vonderhaar of Camden are chair people of the U.S. Wheat Associates and Wheat Foods Council, respectively. They by no means selected an easy year for organization leadership in these groups as a multitude of issues face the industry nationwide, along with unique seasonal challenges here at home.“I’m a fourth-generation farmer,” said Doug Goyings, chair of the U.S. Wheat Associates. “My great-great-grandpa, he came here in 1886 — actually the farmstead where my son lives now. I followed my grandfather’s, great-grandfather’s, and my father’s steps, and I’ve grown the farm considerably since then. We’re approximately 4,500 acres now. My son works with me full time thank goodness because when I’m away doing U.S. Wheat business, I have to have somebody to work. Between my wife and my son, they do an excellent job of keeping up things when I’m gone.”A busy schedule for meetings with U.S. Wheat has coincided with a busy planting schedule, resulting in several nights without sleep.“It’s been a challenge. We’ve ran multiple nights over the nights and no sleep,” he said. “It’s not a good thing for anybody to run those hours, but we had to get it done.”Goyings has been on the USW board since 2009 and is a past chairman of the USW Long-Range Planning Committee. As chairman, Goyings is responsible for a number of things, one of them serving as a representative of the U.S. Wheat Associates near and far.“We interact with a lot of our buyers from around the world and that’s our number one job really is interact with the buyers to make sure they understand how to use U.S. Wheat because we’re one of the most reliable and quality wheats in the world,” he said. “We try to strive and let our customers know that and then they’ll keep coming back and that’s a key thing. You have to have return business. A one-time deal is something you don’t want. You want something year after year.”Though it can be difficult while maintaining a thriving operation back home in Paulding County, the role is a once in a lifetime experience.“I do enjoy doing this. My Dad says he deprived me when I was little because he didn’t let me travel much. I enjoy traveling, and it’s been interesting traveling to the different airports of the world and interacting with people. The world has gotten a lot smaller since I started traveling because most people in the world will speak English and that makes it a lot easier for us to travel,” he said. “I just got back after being gone for almost a month in South Africa and that’s a whole different world there. Basically when it comes down to it, every place in the world has poor areas and every place in the world has excellent cities and downtown areas that are just gorgeous. Every place I’ve been, I’ve seen both sides of everything.”Goyings’ connection to the family farm has helped him connect with international customers around the world.“It’s been interesting. I’ve been traveling quite a bit and I was in Malaysia talking to the buyers over there and what they enjoy is the fact you come from a family farm. They really like to see the pictures of the family farm because it’s important to those buyers around the world,” he said. “It was the same way when I was down in Mexico and Chile, they just enjoy talking to a farmer.”His tenure comes at an interesting time for American grain relations internationally. Several trade deals are of top priority for U.S. Wheat.“A lot of it’s trade. We do have competition now. Years ago, we had Russia that was a grain importer and now they’re the number one exporter in the world. They are a huge competition against us now,” Goyings said. “We just don’t sell anything hardly Europe anymore. Egypt is the number one buyer in the world and we don’t ship anything to them. I think one cargo went in there last year because Russia is competition now.”Just as weather in the heartland is affecting things greatly, it also has a major impact on world dynamics.“This year, Australia is not our competition because they had a drought,” he said. “We kind of hear about all these problems around the world and we try to be there to help our customers know that we are available and we always have wheat.”Goyings’ experience abroad has revealed some prospects for U.S. farmers.“I think Asia is a tremendous opportunity. Southeast Asia, there is a tremendous growth rate there. We’re shipping more wheat into that region so we are very heavily involved in that area,” he said. “We just have to go where we can move it and southeast Asia is a big one.“A difficult one is Africa because Europe and Australia come into there. We continue to work on it and let them know how to use our wheat. We’ve got specialists in all these different countries to show them how to use our wheat, because wheat is a little bit different around the world and we’ve got some advantages of blending our wheat when we ship it out to what the customer wants.”As far as goals go, Goyings has a couple as chairperson that stand out.“I’d definitely like to get things settled with TPP and Japan or whatever we want to call it when we get out agreement there. That’s a big one and also this thing with China, we need to get that trade,” he said. “If we could start shipping wheat in there, it’ll raise all the grain prices if we can get an agreement with them.”Rachael Vonderhaar of Preble County is representing the nation’s wheat growers in her role as chair of the Wheat Foods Council.Those goals if accomplished would change prices around the world, including for producers and consumers here at home. That is the audience focused on by Rachael Vonderhaar of Camden, Ohio, recently named chair of the Wheat Foods Council.“I farm with my husband Alan, my son Adam, and my father-in-law Lynn,” she said. “We raise wheat, malting barley, corn and soybeans, plus a little bit of cattle and sheep.”Vonderhaar has been heavily involved in the Ohio Farm Bureau and other agricultural organizations in the past. It’s no different on the wheat side.“I’m in my second term with the Ohio Small Grains Checkoff and it’s been a great opportunity to explore leadership both within the state of Ohio and nationally. I represent the checkoff to the Wheat Foods Council, and I’ve done that for a few years now and this is my year to slide into Chair there,” she said. “I’m excited and look forward to what the opportunities are ahead and how I can promote wheat domestically across the country.”Different from the U.S. Wheat Council that Goyings is a part of, the Wheat Foods Council is focused on multiple aspects of the process from farm to dinner table.“The Wheat Foods Council is made up of the full supply chain with wheat from producer to elevator, miller, to baker. We’re all there having that conversation together about how we can share the quality wheat with the United States and our consumers and educate them on the types of wheat we have and each of the purposes that are utilized,” Vonderhaar said. “Here in Ohio, we grow soft red winter wheat, and I like to refer to it as the sweet wheat because it’s all the yummy stuff. Your cakes, your cookies, and your alcohols.”Vonderhaar said that last bit with a smile and a quick laugh, though it’s that fun connection that Vonderhaar said is essential to telling the story of wheat with today’s consumer.“The national side is a big place. It’s a big playground and understanding who all is in it is educational not only as a producer, but as a consumer,” she said. “I love to bake and so getting to talk to the millers and the bakers across the country and how that relates back to my personal use has been an amazing experience.”Telling that story as chair of the Wheat Foods Council is a big part of the job, Vonderhaar said, but figuring out exactly who to have that conversation with is another job in itself.“As I’ve worked with the Wheat Foods Council and we’ve done our research, we find that the majority of the public is getting nutritional information from their trainer. So for years, we’ve worked with registered dieticians about sharing the message about wheat and the value of it for health, but we’re realizing we need to talk to those trainers because that’s where most people are reaching out to,” she said. “Sharing the science and the facts and the importance of having grains in the diet just for function and endurance is knowledge that really needs to be shared with the general public.“With the Wheat Foods Council, we do support a triathlete, Michelle Tuttle, who’s also a registered dietician. It’s really neat to listen to her and the diet that she writes for herself. Then you can follow her on social media to understand how she gets her endurance from the grains that she eats.”That unique way of conversation for Vonderhaar has roots that are unique compared to most in agriculture. She did not come from a farm background, but her life experience has led her to her position today.“When I was younger, agriculture was nowhere in the plan I had before me, but I met a boy who stole my heart — he’ll tell you I met a man who won it — with that I was all in. He was a full-time farmer and when I said ‘I do,’ I stepped into it all. I’ve been blessed with an amazing life out on the farm, raising a family, participating in agriculture — but I had a good friend, Jane Marshall, at the county fair had a lunch with me and she said, ‘You know what, I think we have a lot in common and I’d like to invite you to an Ohio Agri Women meeting.’ From there I went to an American Agri Women’s meeting and I was pulled in. I just want to be part of having the conversation and translating the information from the farm to the consumer. How do we have that conversation? Because we all talk about food in a different way and so those of us that raise it and produce it, we use a lot of language that’s not common for the common consumer to understand. We’ve been really open our farm to host anyone that wants to take a look and talk about what we’re doing, but I think participating in those groups has really helped me understand the value of sharing that information and being open with it.”Whether it be far away or right down the road, both Vonderhaar and Goyings encourage farmers of all ages to get involved in having the conversation, both within the industry and outside of it, telling the story of agriculture at home and around the world.last_img read more

Indian Navy officer

first_img“The soldier is the Army. No army is better than its soldiers. The Soldier is also a citizen. In fact, the highest obligation and privilege of citizenship is that of bearing arms for one’s country.” – George S. Patton Jr.The Indian navy:The Indian Navy is a well-balanced and cohesive three dimensional force, capable of operating above, on and under surface of the oceans efficiently safeguarding our national interests.Indian Navy officer- career:An officer at a very young age assumes the responsibility of commanding his men and use of latest equipment on the ships, submarines or even air-crafts. Working in the latest technology environment, the young officers are exposed to the very best in their field of operations.The cutting-edge technology and revolution in military affairs makes the career very challenging in the Indian Navy. It is the only service that operates regularly with the other navies of the world. This not only helps in professional expertise of an individual but provides opportunities to exhibit our talent with pride all across the world. Men in white command dignity and respect and are always in high spirits as the service offers personal, financial, emotional security and status in the society.Skills required: Adaptability to all aspects of lifeCourageLeadership skillsAbility to sacrificeStrong headedMasculine builtIndependentSocialDisciplinedPlacid and patientDeterminationFighting spiritClarity of thoughtExpressionResolveGroomedAware and knowledgeable about all technicalitiesApplication criteria:To join Indian Navy, apply in NDA exam held by the UPSC twice every year.If you are in 10+2, you can apply for NDA exam.Note that only unmarried male candidates are eligible to apply for NDA exam and you must have aged between 16.5 and 19.For qualifying this exam, you will have to pass three stages:Written ExamSSB InterviewMedical TestIf you have completed your graduation, then you can apply for CDS exam held by UPSC twice a year.advertisementCommands:The Navy has the following three commands, each under the control of a Flag Officer Commanding-in-Chief:The Western Naval Command (Headquarters at Mumbai)The Eastern Naval Command (Headquarters at Visakhapatnam)The Southern Naval Command (Headquarters at Kochi)Careers:Executive Branch:As an officer of the Executive Branch, one can exercise command of ships, submarines and aircraft. Executive officers can specialise in the following:Gunnery & MissilesNavigation and DirectionAnti-Submarine WarfareCommunicationsPilotObserverSubmarineHydrographyDivingEngineering Branch:Modern ships, submarines and aircraft are fitted with advanced technology machinery and propulsion systems. As an engineer officer, you will be responsible for keeping all these hi-tech systems serviceable. Opportunities exist to work in gigantic naval dockyards and indigenous production units. In no other career is an engineer exposed to such a wide spectrum of opportunities and to keep abreast of modern developments. An engineer officer’s career is interspersed with technical courses up to post-graduation level in India/abroad.Electrical Branch:In addition, complex missile systems, underwater weapons, radar and radio communication equipment form major part of a warship’s equipment. A majority of these are either computer-based or computer aided and incorporate the latest trends in electronics engineering. For a ship to be able to fight effectively, all these equipment must be kept working at peak efficiency. Electrical Officers have this responsibility and other challenging tasks. To sharpen their skills, the Navy offers excellent opportunities for post-graduate courses in India/abroad to deserving candidatesEducation Branch:Any service will be as good as the training its officers and men receive. As an Education Officer you will play a major role in the training of naval officers/sailors. Education Officers are responsible for scientific and methodical instructions, including theoretical aspects of technical subjects of all branches of the navy and also for general education. An Education Officer can specialise in almost all specialisations of the Executive Branch.Where to study?Officer’s recruitment is advertised through the Employment News and all important national and regional newspapers/dailies. Selection for Permanent Commission through 10+2 NDA/Indian Naval Academy cadet entry and CDSE (Graduate) entry is through a written examination conducted by the UPSC followed by an interview by the Service Selection Board (SSB).For all other Permanent Commission entries and Short Service Commission entries there is no written examination. These applications are shortlisted as per the criteria laid down by the Naval Headquarters, Directorate of Manpower Planning & Recruitment. Selection is through merit alone.Cultural integration:India is a large country with diverse religion, culture, tradition and values. The Navy draws its immensely talented personnel from communities of all kinds from all across the country. In the Navy we have an ethos of equality and therefore men from different background and diverse culture who join the Navy are brought together without showing any bias to a particular person or group. The Indian Navy is resolutely committed to ensuring that all personnel are treated equally and equal opportunities are provided at work and training. The advancement in the career is based solely on individual merits and ability.advertisementPay:The pay of a Navy Officer depends entirely on the department he is working in and for whom. Also, gradually, as years pass by the serving officer’s pay increases with the ranks he upgrades to. When the officer decides to leave the service (after 20 years of serving the INF) he/she gets a pension plan which increases as an when the pay commissions increase. Benefits/perks: Free health and medical facilities for officer and familyMess, clubs, sports facilities at extremely cheap ratesFurnished government accommodation at best locationsPension with all benefits60 days of annual leave20 days of casual leaveLeave encashment up to 300 daysFree rationScope:Career scope in the Indian Navy is not only very high but the job is an extremely adventurous one! It is extremely easy to qualify through INF provided you are someone who physically and mentally unbeatable. A highly reputed job with numerous advantages. What more could one ask for.last_img read more