Harvard rolls out plan for the future

first_imgBusinesses, government, and social-sector institutions — including higher education — must incorporate a deeper consideration of human well-being into the evolving approach to sustainable development at all levels, noted Harvard professors William Clark and Jack Spengler in the introduction to the Harvard Sustainability Plan.The plan, released today, builds on this premise by setting a holistic vision and clear priorities for how the University will move toward an even healthier, more sustainable campus community. The five-year operational plan, created with input from hundreds of students, faculty, and staff, targets reductions in energy, water, and waste while also focusing on sustainable operations, culture change, and human health.“This plan recognizes that creating a sustainable campus strengthens our core research and teaching mission, and it acknowledges that the challenges before us are complex and interconnected, demanding an ever-developing approach to sustainability,” Harvard President Drew Faust wrote in the foreword. “It considers the University’s role in the world and recognizes our shared responsibility to build and operate a campus that contributes to the well-being of every member of our community — and ultimately to the health of the planet.”The plan centers around five core topics: emissions and energy, campus operations, nature and ecosystems, health and well-being, and culture and learning. From there it builds on the substantial progress that has already been achieved in reducing energy and emissions, building and running greener, more efficient buildings, and implementing sustainable operations throughout campus. It also encourages students, faculty, and staff to continue piloting sustainability solutions throughout the University by using Harvard’s cutting-edge research and teaching to tackle real-world challenges on campus“What’s exciting about this plan is that it’s spearheading the next steps of the sustainability movement by pushing into new contexts beyond greenhouse-gas emissions and challenging us to think more holistically,” said Michael Popejoy, a fellow in the Department of Philosophy, and member of the University’s Council of Student Sustainability Leaders. “It was a valuable opportunity as a student to be part of something that could have such far-reaching effects, and my hope is that students can be instrumental in carrying the plan forward by implementing it in their lives both on and off campus.”A science-based goal established in 2008 to reduce greenhouse-gas emissions 30 percent by 2016, is the University’s most ambitious sustainability commitment to date. Comprehensive Green Building Standards in place since 2009 have made the University a leader in green building, with more LEED-certified projects than any other higher education institution in the world, according to the U.S. Green Building Council.In addition to the existing climate goal, which takes growth into account, three additional sustainability goals are laid out in the plan and set specific targets within a set timeframe:Waste: Reduce waste per capita 50 percent by 2020 from a 2006 baseline, with the goal of becoming a zero-waste campus.Water: Reduce University-wide water use 30 percent by 2020 from a 2006 baseline, including process, irrigation, and potable water use.Landscaping: Maintain at least 75 percent of the University’s landscaped areas organically by 2020.Additionally, Harvard plans to establish and require compliance with operational standards in the areas of green building, green cleaning, green IT, climate preparedness, procurement, and healthful food. The standards were developed to ensure that a consistent approach is being implemented. But because Harvard is a decentralized organization, they were also designed with input from Schools and departments to allow for maximum flexibility in how they are implemented.“Our approach to sustainability is to tap into the creative ideas and innovations that our students, faculty, and staff are generating on the local level and then work to replicate them across the University for greater impact,” said Executive Vice President Katie Lapp. “This plan will align the University’s Schools and departments around common goals, standards, and commitments for moving forward.”The plan also outlines a stronger focus on health and well-being as a core priority in future years. The University pledges to increase participation and access to the Healthy Harvard wellness initiative, and to reduce the Harvard community’s exposure to toxic chemicals, with a special focus on the natural and built environment, indoor air quality, furnishing, and cleaning products. As part of this commitment, Harvard will identify and target at least two significant chemicals of concern for which viable alternatives exist, and develop a plan for eliminating exposure to those chemicals on campus.Finally, Harvard set out 32 commitments and recommendations for future research and action in areas ranging from sustainable procurement requirements for vendors, to governance and engagement programs designed to build a culture of sustainability across the University.The Harvard Office for Sustainability (OFS) led the development of the Sustainability Plan after a multiyear stakeholder engagement process, and has already begun to implement it as part of a University-wide engagement strategy. To ensure transparency and continual improvement, OFS will release an annual University-wide report in meeting the plan’s goals via the online Sustainability Impact Report.Ultimately, those involved with its development say the plan should be viewed as a vehicle for empowering individual action and entrepreneurialism in sustainability at every level of the University. “The creation of Harvard’s first University-wide Sustainability Plan is much more than an exercise in strategic planning,” wrote Clark and Spengler in its introduction. “It is an opportunity for every member of our community to reflect on what role they can play in enhancing our collective well-being for a more sustainable future.”last_img read more

Can-Can, Hunchback & Ever After on Tap for New Paper Mill Season

first_img View Comments A revival of 2010’s Broadway musical Elf will be mounted for the festive season. Adapted from the 2003 film starring Will Farrell, the show tells the tale of Buddy, an orphan who is mistakenly transported to the North Pole and raised by Santa’s elves. Now, as a grownup, he embarks on a journey to discover his true identity. With a book by Thomas Meehan and Bob Martin, music by Matthew Sklar and lyrics by Chad Beguelin, the production will play November 26 through January 4, 2015. Star Files Sierra Boggess The American premiere of The Hunchback of Notre Dame will run March 4 through April 5, 2015. Based on the novel by Victor Hugo, with music by Alan Menken, lyrics by Stephen Schwartz, a book by Peter Parnell and directed by Scott Schwartz, the show is an intimate retelling of the famous love story.  Paper Mill’s 76th season will close with the world-premiere of Ever After, a new musical adapted from the 1998 film starring Drew Barrymore. The production will be directed and choreographed by Tony winner Kathleen Marshall. Casting has not yet been announced for any of the shows but Broadway.com Audience Choice Award winners Sierra Boggess and Jeremy Jordan headlined the most recent industry-only workshop of the piece.center_img Jeremy Jordan Paper Mill Playhouse has announced a packed 2014-15 season. The lineup includes the Broadway-bound Can-Can, revivals of Elf and Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike, the U.S. premiere of The Hunchback of Notre Dame and the world premiere of Ever After. Next up will be the Tony-winning Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike, which will run January 21 through February 15, 2015. Christopher Durang’s play mixes four distinct characters and dishes up a hilarious stew. First up is the Broadway-bound revival of Cole Porter’s Can-Can. Directed by David Lee, the show will feature a book by Abe Burrows revised by Lee and Joel Fields. Pistache, a Parisian café owner, decides to feature the scandalous dance, the Can-Can, but will her defiance of the law end her business and her love life? With choreography by Patti Colombo, the production will play October 1 through October 26.last_img read more

A company from Slavonia furnishes American hotels with furniture

first_imgThat Slavonia can and knows differently is an example of furniture manufacturer Ancona grupa doo from Đakovo, which has been entrusted with equipping five hotels in the United States, from New York through Washington to Miami, writes Business diary.It is about Ancona Group from Đakovo, which produces furniture in its own production, and employs over 120 employees. “These are two hotel chains there and an international competition. Four hotels belong to the Club Quarters chain, three of which are in New York and one in Washington, these four we have to equip by the end of the year. I’m going to America next week because of an arrangement for a possible four more outfits next year. There are indications that this could turn into a very serious business. It has also been agreed to equip a hotel belonging to the Even chain, located in Miami, and we have to deliver it by March or April next year. We sent a model room to America for a project in Miami, and to equip hotels in New York and Washington is already working hard in production”Points out the owner of Ancona Group, Markica Stanušić for Poslovni dnevnik.Photo: Ancona groupExactly one “small” company from Croatia managed to contract the equipping of five American hotels in 2017 and 2018 through a regular tender. You know when you apply for a job and if you have the best offer you get a job. So simple and normal, right?”I was on a trip to America last year for Christmas and New Year. I accidentally booked the Club Quarters hotel and when I arrived, I expected a lot more. We went through a dozen hotels, but the furniture seemed terribly cheap, modest. I contacted an agent I met at the fair and asked if we had the opportunity to compete there. There was a competition, and just for that hotel where I stayed for the first time. We called and – passed ” Stanušić points out and adds that his new client has so far imported everything from the Blistok East, and never from Europe. “I don’t know what they expected here, but when they saw the company, the facilities, the model room, our approach to work, they went in amazement”Concludes Stanušić.Let’s buy Croatian. Meet them – Ancona GroupRelated news:EXCELLENT COOPERATION! PRIMA FURNITURE EQUIPPED BLUESUN 5-STAR HOTELSHOTEL ESPLANADE RECOGNIZED THE QUALITY OF CROATIAN FASHION DESIGN AND CREATED A COLLECTION OF NEW UNIFORMS FOR HOTEL RECEPTION EMPLOYEESLUXURY TOURISM IS NOT GOLDEN FAUCETS BUT QUALITY DESIGNlast_img read more

Podcast forensic DNA predictions and Zika mosquito detection

first_img DNA fingerprinting has been used to link people to crimes for decades, by matching DNA from a crime scene to DNA extracted from a suspect. Now, investigators are using other parts of the genome—such as markers for hair and eye color—to help rule people in and out as suspects. Staff Writer Gretchen Vogel talks with Sarah Crespi about whether science supports this approach and how different countries are dealing with this new type of evidence.Sarah also talks with Jill Fernandes of the University of Queensland in Brisbane, Australia, about her Science Advances paper on a light-based technique for detecting Zika in mosquitoes. Instead of grinding up the bug and extracting Zika DNA, her group shines near-infrared light through the body. Mosquitoes carrying Zika transmit this light differently from uninfected ones. If it’s successful in larger trials, this technique could make large-scale surveillance of infected mosquitoes quicker and less expensive.In our monthly books segment, Jen Golbeck talks with author Sarah-Jayne Blakemore about her new work: Inventing Ourselves: The Secret Life of the Teenage Brain. You can check out more book reviews and share your thoughts on the Books et al. blog.This week’s episode was edited by Podigy.Listen to previous podcasts.[Image: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health; Music: Jeffrey Cook] National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health last_img read more