Holyfield open to Mike Tyson trilogy fight

first_imgRelatedPosts Mike Tyson comeback fight postponed WBA Champion Charr to hold Ruiz Jr talks Mike Tyson beats up seven prostitutes Evander Holyfield is willing to step into the ring for a third time with Mike Tyson.The two heavyweight legends fought in 1996 and 1997, with Holyfield reigning victorious on both occasions. The second fight was notorious for Tyson biting his opponent’s ear during the third round.Iron Mike is keen to return to the ring at the age of 53 and has been posting videos which clearly show he’s still got his terrifying speed and power.Holyfield, 57, is also planning to come out of retirement for an exhibition bout, but admits Tyson would not be his first choice.Holyfield told TMZ: “I’m always thinking that the person who takes care of themselves well are the ones that tend to last, even though I’m four years older than him (Tyson). It would be no problem.“You know my manager he has been talking and all that, but the fact is with me the only person I would really ask is Riddick Bowe because me and him are buddies.” When asked if he’d be prepared to face Tyson again, he added: “I would think so. You know life is about two people really trusting each other and what can we do now. There is a lot of things Mike and I have done together that works.“Obviously people like to see the two best people. Some people didn’t get the chance to see Mike and I. Everything is opinionated now about who the best is. I was the best of my era I felt.“I can’t have anyone take a cheap shot at me I’m a little too old to get that stuff happening to me. The body don’t come back as well.”Tags: BOXINGEvander HolyfieldHeavyweightsmike tysonlast_img read more

New district hospital opens in Soweto

first_img2 May 2014 Health Minister Aaron Motsoaledi officially opened the R730-million, 300-bed Zola-Jabulani District Hospital in Soweto on Wednesday, saying the new facility would help to ease the load on Soweto’s Chris Hani Baragwanath Hospital. The new hospital will provide accident and emergency services, maternity and post-natal care, as well as gynaecology, obstetrics, radiology, outpatient and pharmaceutical services. It has three theatres for minor operations such as caesarean sections and appendectomies. So far, 921 professionals have been appointed to the hospital, including 26 doctors, 451 nurses and 148 admin staff, and R49.7-million has been spent on medical equipment for the facility. The hospital will mainly service the northern and western communities of Soweto, including Dobsonville, Emdeni, Meadowlands, Moletsane, Mofolo, Zola and Jabulani. Speaking at Wednesday’s opening, Motsoaledi noted that Chris Hani Baragwanath had 2 888 beds, far above the World Health Organisation’s recommendation. He said a hospital with over 1 200 beds was difficult to manage. He said South Africa’s population was growing at a rapid rate, with major implications for its health care facilities. “The solution is to build more hospitals,” he said, adding that in his opinion two more hospitals were needed in Soweto. Referring to the Health Standard Compliance Office, Motsoaledi said inspectors would visit the new hospital to check issues like infection control, the attitude of staff towards patients, cleanliness and waiting times for patients. Gauteng Premier Nomvula Mokonyane apologised to the community for the long time it took to open the hospital. “When we came into office in 2009, we committed ourselves to give Soweto the best.” Premier Mokonyane urged the community to look after the new infrastructure. “Let’s treasure this place,” she said. Source: SAnews.govlast_img read more

Trouble on the Roof

first_imgOur expert’s point of viewHere’s how GBA technical director Peter Yost looks at it:Having investigated a number of SIP roof moisture problems, rule number one is to back up every panel joint that is foam-sealed with a pressure-sensitive adhesive (PSA) tape. Over time, even the best of foam sealants can develop hairline cracks with repeated contraction and expansion. The flexible PSA tape maintains the air barrier should the joint sealant fail. And because of wintertime stack effect, even the smallest of cracks at the roof line lead to warm moist air leaking into the panel joint and condensing. So, all SIP joints need to be sealed and taped to be part of a longterm continuous air barrier system. The need for this is greatest in the roof system, typically, because it goes through the most dramatic temperature and expansion-contraction cycles.In this case, I am afraid that the roofing panels need to be removed so that all of the SIP joints can be taped. Leakage may be most pronounced at the ridge, but sooner or later, you will almost certainly be needing that flexible backup PSA tape at all panel joints. And yes, the SIP installer is liable here, to the extent that best practice is belt-and-suspenders at panel joints.Rule number two: check the building pressure balance with the HVAC running. You need to know whether the HVAC system is making matters worse.Rule number three: check to see if your HVAC system is both properly sized and has the climate-appropriate Sensible Heat Ratio (SHR). An oversized AC unit could be short-cycling and not accomplishing enough latent heat (moisture) removal, aiding and abetting condensation at your interior roof finish. And a unit with the proper SHR means the AC unit is designed to “favor” latent heat or moisture removal in hot-humid climates. An SHR no greater than 0.70 makes sense in Kentucky. Jeremy Ballard is living in a relatively new home built with structural insulated panels (SIPs), and he’s already spotted something that’s keeping him up at night. The weather in Kentucky is turning hot and humid, and with the humidity has come condensation on corrugated metal panels installed on the interior of the roof.“Our center ceiling beams are dripping wet throughout the day, causing small puddles on the floor,” Ballard writes in a post in the Q&A forum at GreenBuildingAdvisor. “The ceiling is hot to the touch at the very peak on either side of the center beam. I believe hot outside air is leaking in.”As he starts a round of calls to his builder, the SIP manufacturer, and the manufacturer that provided the frame, Ballard looks for recommendations on how the problem can be corrected. Seams between SIPs are not taped, either on the inside or the outside, and they’re now inaccessible. Other possible clues: the unvented metal roofing is installed over furring strips and a layer of “double bubble,” a foil-faced product sold as insulation.Another question faced by Ballard: Who’s responsible for making it right? Among the candidates are the general contractor for the house, the manufacturer of the SIPs, and possibly himself.“I couldn’t sleep last night thinking how this cost our family over $32,000 for the SIPs and the first summer [they] are failing,” Ballard says.That’s the topic for this Q&A Spotlight. Suspect seals at the ridgeBallard can add some visual evidence that air leaks at the ridge are behind the problem. He provides a photo taken during construction showing a gap of at least an inch between SIPs at the ridge, with a bit of gasket material showing (see Image #2, below).“I was ignorant during construction, but realized this was not right,” he says. “I sent the picture to the manufacturer a year ago when it occurred and the response was that my concerns were not valid. I poorly chose to rely on the professional opinion. However, the evidence now is that my concerns are valid.”Ballard doesn’t quibble with any of the comments that have been posted, but the real question is how to fix it. He thinks a possible solution is to seal the entire ridge from the inside and “basically build the ceiling down below some sort of added seal and barrier.”Following that, he adds, the ridge should come off and the seam sealed from that side as well.“I have no idea what could seal it, but I wouldn’t be opposed to a solution of adding up to a couple of inches to the inside if it assured a bullet-proof seal,” he says.Start at the ridge, says GBA senior editor Martin Holladay, by removing the ridge flashing. “If the removal of the ridge flashing exposes enough of the SIPs on both sides of the ridge to install SIP tape,” Hollladay says, “then the fix would involve spraying the gap between the SIPs with spray foam; trimming the foam after it cures; and then installing SIP tape that is wide enough to stretch from the SIP on one side of the roof, over the ridge, and onto the SIP on the other side of the roof.”If removing the ridge flashing does not expose enough of the SIPs to do this work, the builder will have to remove enough of the roofing screws to lift or remove the roofing panels, “as needed to gain access to the ridge area.”And while this work is underway, Ballard might think about hiring a home performance contractor to find out why the house is depressurized in relation to the outside, a condition which is encouraging the influx of warm, moist air. The builder might be able to expose enough of the roof to correct the leaks by removing the ridge cap, but that prospect seems unlikely because in an unvented roof the metal roofing would extend very close to the ridge. “But perhaps,” he adds, “the ridge cap is large enough to allow some wiggle room up there.”He also suggests that a home performance contractor equipped with a blower door and an infrared camera might be able to identify other air leaks in the house. A good home performance contractor might also help determine whether the HVAC system is depressurizing the house and contributing to the problem.Exposing the ridge might also reveal the “other side of this coin,” writes Andy Chappell-Dick: “warm, moist air leaking out in the winter.”Everyone in the SIP business, from manufacturer to installer, knows the importance of a “belt-and-suspenders” approach to air sealing, he adds. “Due to the high pressures of winter stack effect, the most critical interior joint to seal is the peak, that one that is now inaccessible,” Chappell-Dick says. Yes, air leaks are the culpritDavid Meiland has no doubt the problem is a leaky roof assembly. “As you allude to, the issue is probably air leakage and the solution is to seal the joints where air is leaking in,” he writes.If the builder responds to Ballard’s requests for help, Meiland adds, he will probably want to correct the problem from inside the house by caulking the seam on either side of the ridge beam. But the real solution is elsewhere: on the outside of the house, where the seams between adjoining SIPs should be sealed with tape. Structural Insulated Panelscenter_img RELATED ARTICLES CONSTRUCTION DETAILS And who’s responsible for this mess?There seems to be some consensus on how to fix the problem (tackle it from the outside, not the inside), but now it gets a little sticky. Who is legally responsible for the repairs?Ballard had a general contractor/builder for the house, but he hired a SIP installation crew under a separate contract. To be precise, he says, he paid the SIP manufacturer, paid their installation crew, and then paid his GC to come in and finish the roof with flashing and trim. “In my mind,” he says, “the SIP install contractor is the person I need to be talking to.”That makes you the GC for the SIPs, says Holladay, adding, “It’s up to you to pursue the problem with the crew that you paid.”Stephen Sheehy, who practiced construction law, suggests that Ballard invite both the general contractor and the SIP contractor to the house for a chat.“Otherwise, it is highly likely that the SIP contractor will blame the GC and the GC will blame the SIP contractor,” he writes. “You need to emphasize that they have a problem and you need it fixed by either or both of them. I’d copy my lawyer on any correspondence.“One lesson you’ve learned the hard way is that there is significant risk in carving out a part of the construction of the building envelope and hiring a sub yourself,” Sheehy continues. “While the SIP installer may very well have screwed up, maybe the GC made matters worse. Maybe the GC should have noticed the problem before the roofing went on. But does the GC have an obligation to inspect work by subs hired directly by you? Probably not.” Green Basics: Structural Insulated PanelsHow to Protect Structural Insulated Panels from Decay Air-Sealing SIP Seams Q&A: How to Protect Structural Insulated Panels from DecayQ&A: SIPs RidgingStay Away from Foil-Faced Bubble Wraplast_img read more

Top 5 After Effects Expressions for Better Designs

first_imgNew to using expressions in After Effects? These 5 AE expressions are a great start and will add power to your After Effects workflow.Expressions can seem really scary if you are new to After Effects. It took me a while to be comfortable with expressions to the point that I could write them on my own instead of copying from a Google search. They take time to learn, so have patience with them! There are many useful After Effects expressions that can automate processes and make your animations even better.According to motion designer and Premiumbeat blogger Sean Frangella, the following expressions are the top 5 to learn in After Effects. These provide a solid base for getting comfortable with AE expressions, but they only represent a small sample of what is possible. If you want to learn more about using expressions try checking out previous post:  How to Use Expressions in After EffectsFeel free to copy and paste these expressions into your own projects. Implement them into your AE workflow often and pretty soon you won’t need to copy them at all!In the following video tutorial, Sean Frangella shows us how to use all 5 of these expressions along with a few other great tips.This video was created by Sean Frangella. Along with having an awesome YouTube channel, Sean creates Cinema 4D tutorials here on the PremiumBeat blog. If you want to find some more insightful tutorials from Sean or chat with him, check out his facebook page.1. Wigglewiggle(1,15)The wiggle expression is by far the expression that I use the most in After Effects. Wiggle expressions do exactly what you might imagine, they wiggle an object across random values. This expression can be used to make your scene seem more organic and natural.The first number is the number of wiggles per second and the second number is the value of the wiggle. So, a position parameter with an expression of wiggle(2,30) will wiggle 2 times per second at up to 30 different expressions.2. Timetime*10The time expression is perfect for objects with perpetual motion. For example if you wanted to have an object rotate indefinitely you can simply add the word time as the rotation parameter and your object will rotate 1 degree for ever second. The time parameter also works with basic math equations, so if you wanted to have the previous object rotate 30 times faster, you can simply have the expression time*30.3. loopOut()loopOut()The loopOut() expression creates an infinite loop that will last forever. However, unlike the wiggle and time expression the loopOut() expression requires keyframes to be present. So if you had an object that rotates in a full circle in the span of 1 second you could add the loopOut() expression and the motion will be repeated forever.4. seedRandom()seedRandom(5)seedRandom() is just a hair more complicated than the previous keyframes, but it completely makes sense after you think about it for a few seconds.Random numbers aren’t completely random in After Effects. Sure, it may be called ‘random’, but in reality true random values cannot be achieved in javascript and subsequently After Effects. It’s for this reason that “random” numbers need to begin with some sort of base number. When After Effects draws this base number it uses the layer number that can be found on the far left side of the layer in the timeline. Each different iteration of “random” is called a seed so a random seed of 1 is different from a random seed of 2, but if you had similar wiggle expressions (i.e. wiggle(3,2)) with say a random seed of 5, they would actually wiggle in the exact same way.If you were to change a layer’s order in the timeline from slot 3 to slot 10 it’s random seed would change, thus your wiggle will now look completely different. This isn’t a huge problem, but sometimes a certain wiggle iteration looks absolutely perfect and you don’t want them to change if your project order changes. To fix this you can use the seedRandom() expression. This expression locks random seeds so that your expression doesn’t change if you add in new layers.5. Math.round()Math.round()Math.round() is an expression that rounds up decimal numbers to the nearest whole number. This is perfect for doing countdowns or numbers in the source text. Simply add your normal expression into the Math.round() expression parenthesis in your source text expression box and all your numbers will be rounded up.If you are really wanting to learn the ins-and-outs of expressions in After Effects, CodeAcademy offers an informative free JavaScript course that’s 100% free and worth checking out.Have any other expressions that you frequently use?Share in the comments below.last_img read more